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100 years Chinese Archaeology Lecture Series 2021

Archaeological excavations in China in modern times have occurred since the late 19th century, often organized by non-Chinese expeditions who took advantage of the tumultous times and unregulated situation in many regions. Also and famously, the beginning of the consecutive finds of the so-called oracle bone inscriptions at Anyang can be traced back to the years after 1899. So in many senses, Chinese archaeology is older than a century. However, the 1920s mark another kind of beginning for the discipline, as this was the decade that saw many of the most epochal finds in China, framed by the discovery of the Neolithic Yangshao ceramic complex in 1921 and that of the homo erectus pekinensis in 1929 and including the decades-long first fully Chinese-led modern excavation at Anyang from 1928 onward. Therefore, rather than taking the exact year of the “birth of Chinese archaeology” too seriously, we are happy to use this historical background as a convenient reason to celebrate the really astounding results that this discipline has achieved so far and especially in recent times. This should serve as both an introduction to specialists of non-Chinese archaeologies as well as to non-archaeological specialists on China. And it should serve as a forum for specialists on Chinese archaeology to talk about the latest developments in the field and think together about solutions for some of the more vexing and fascinating problems the field is facing right now. The topics, most of which have a certain provocative edge or focus on unsolved questions, have been chosen with the latter consideration in mind. (Enno Giele, Heidelberg University)

For more information and to get register, please visit: https://www.zo.uni-heidelberg.de/sinologie/arch/ls2021.html

CALL FOR ABSTRACT: 19th Conference of the International Workgroup for Palaeoethnobotany

The University of South Bohemia and the Institute of Archaeology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague will be hosting the 19th Conference of the International Workgroup for Palaeoethnobotany from June 13-17, 2022. Abstract submission will open on September 15, 2021, and end on January 10, 2022. 

For more information, and to register, visit: http://iwgp2022.elementadmin.cz/

Cosmopolitan Pasts of China and the Eurasian World cover graphic

LMU Munich virtual conference "Cosmopolitan Pasts of China and the Eurasian World"

Virtual international conference
“Cosmopolitan Pasts of China and the Eurasian World”
2021 June 11, 12, 18, 19, from 1500 CET (2100 China, 0900 EST, 0600 PST)

Free and open to all. Registration required. Go to: https://www.cosmopolitanpasts.sinologie.lmu.de.
For questions, please contact Dr. Annie Chan at cosmos@ostasien.fak12.uni-muenchen.de.

Abstract:

Cosmopolitanism may prove to be the creed of our times. Globalized infrastructure and digital technologies have rendered alien political and cultural spheres unprecedentedly more accessible, hospitable, and intelligible, but also made visible new structures of segregation and “othering”. The paradoxical challenges of cosmopolitanism in tolerance and communication are, however, hardly a modern geopolitical tale, nor characteristically European for that matter. Statesmen in pre-imperial China had reached for the notion of “tianxia” (all under Heaven) somewhere between a concentric “fu” zoning by degree of civility, an all-encompassing appreciation of “xing” (human nature), and a mix of bridling and conciliatory diplomatic strategies. It was the expansive realization of this cosmic order that then made Tang Dynasty the (arguably) quintessentially cosmopolitan -and great Chinese- epoch. Fast forward to early Republic China, cosmopolitan ideals of Western education gave voice to the modernization of Chinese poetry and provided inspiration for literary exoticism and patriotism.
 

Densities of people per hectare in the Greater Angkor Region over time.

NEW ARTICLE: Diachronic modeling of the population within the medieval Greater Angkor Region settlement complex

Diachronic modeling of the population within the medieval Greater Angkor Region settlement complex

Authors: Sarah Klassen, Alison K. Carter, Damian H. Evans , Scott Ortman, Miriam T. Stark, Alyssa A. Loyless, Martin Polkinghorne, Piphal Heng, Michael Hill, Pelle Wijker, Jonathan Niles-Weed, Gary P. Marriner, Christophe Pottier , Roland J. Fletcher

Abstract: Angkor is one of the world’s largest premodern settlement complexes (9th to 15th centuries CE), but to date, no comprehensive demographic study has been completed, and key aspects of its population and demographic history remain unknown. Here, we combine lidar, archaeological excavation data, radiocarbon dates, and machine learning algorithms to create maps that model the development of the city and its population growth through time. We conclude that the Greater Angkor Region was home to approximately 700,000 to 900,000 inhabitants at its apogee in the 13th century CE. This granular, diachronic, paleodemographic model of the Angkor complex can be applied to any ancient civilization.

https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/7/19/eabf8441.full

 

Charred seeds from the Wanggedang site during the Longshan period (1. Foxtail millet; 2. Broomcorn millet; 3. Rice; 4. Soybean)

On the advancement of agriculture during the Pre-Qin period in the Central Plain of China from archaeobotanical findings

On the advancement of agriculture during the Pre-Qin period in the Central Plain of China from archaeobotanical findings

BY Hua Zhong, Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

The Central Plain in China has been a core area of research, including on the origin of Chinese civilization, the process of social complexity, the formation of early states, etc. Throughout the Pre-Qin period, there were at least three profound changes in agriculture in this region. These developments demonstrate local advancements as well as deeply influencing trends of cultural development.

FULLY FUNDED PHD PROGRAMME: Collecting China in Scotland

About the Project

The presence of Chinese material culture in Scotland has grown significantly over the last 200 years, much of it during Britain’s imperial expansion. However, Scottish collecting of Chinese material culture has never been studied through the lenses of critical collecting practices or decolonisation. The proposed PhD project will address this gap by researching Scottish collecting of Chinese objects in the early 20th century, currently held at NMS and selected Scottish museums.

CALL FOR PAPERS: ROUTLEDGE HANDBOOK OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE MEDIA IN THE 21ST CENTURY

ROUTLEDGE HANDBOOK OF ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE MEDIA IN THE 21ST CENTURY The field of archaeology has long entertained media coverage in print, on television and in film. With the rapid expansion of the internet, mobile technologies and video gaming, archaeology has become further immersed in digital media. Whether the use of these platforms are for public engagement, scholarly communication or pure entertainment, the field of archaeology is irretrievably part of the media landscape.

JOB POSTING: Associate Professor of Indigenous Archaeology in Hokkaido

The Center for Ainu and Indigenous Studies Hokkaido University is inviting international applications for the position of Associate Professor to be placed at GSI. The position is open to a young English-speaking researcher (or a young non-native English-speaking researcher with the ability and experience to use English as a research language without difficulty) in the field of Indigenous Archaeology. This position is a Full-time position but nontenured until 31 March 2026.

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