New fieldwork or research discoveries? Upcoming conference or workshop? New job opening or fellowship posting? New book?

Share the latest news of your work with your colleagues, advertise for job or fellowship openings, find participants for your conference session and more on the SEAA blog.

Guidelines: All posts should be related in some way to East Asian Archaeology. When writing your post, please use capital letters for surnames. Original script (Chinese, Korean, Japanese) for East Asian place names, personal names, or archaeological terms is encouraged. For the transcription of East Asian language terms, Pinyin for Chinese, Hepburn for Japanese, and the Korean Government System (2000) for Korean is encouraged.

Contributions should be limited to around 500 words and 1-2 images. For longer descriptions of your projects, you may consider the Reports section of the Bulletin (BSEAA).

Members can submit their news posts to the SEAA web editor via the website (see SEAA Members' Area for details and instructions on blog submissions) or via email. Non-member contributions are also welcome and may be submitted via email to the SEAA web editor.

The editor(s) reserves the right to carry out minor editing, or to decline contributions inappropriate to the objectives of SEAA.

Multi Dimensional Scaling (MDS) plot of whole coding sequences of mitogenome of Paleolithic, Jomon, Yayoi and present-day individuals in Japan

New Article: Population dynamics in the Japanese Archipelago since the Pleistocene revealed by complete mitochondrial genome sequences

Population dynamics in the Japanese Archipelago since the Pleistocene revealed by the complete mitochondrial genome sequences

Authors: Fuzuki Mizuno, Jun Gojobori, Masahiko Kumagai, Hisao Baba, Yasuhiro Taniguchi, Osamu Kondo, Masami Matsushita, Takayuki Matsushita, Fumihiko Matsuda, Koichiro Higasa,  Michiko Hayashi, Li Wang, Kunihiko Kurosaki and Shintaroh Ueda

Peter Bellwood Announced as Winner of the International Cosmos Prize

SEAA is pleased to announce Prof. Peter Bellwood from Australian National University has been awarded the 28th International Cosmos Prize for his contributions to developing our understanding of past human societies, and especially his research on the early farming dispersal hypothesis in Southeast Asia. For more information see the following links:

https://www.expo-cosmos.or.jp/english/news/the-winner-of-the-202128th-international-cosmos-prize.html

https://www.anu.edu.au/news/all-news/anu-archaeologist-awarded-top-honour-for-lifes-work--

RESOURCE: Database of Religious History

What is the DRH? 

The DRH is a massive, standardized, searchable encyclopedia of the current best scholarly opinion on historical religious traditions and the historical record more generally.

It allows users to instantly gain an overview of the state of scholarly opinion and access powerful, built-in analytic and data visualization tools.

Want to contribute? 

If you are a historian or religious studies expert, you can help make the DRH better. It is a great chance to contribute to an important academic resource. The DRH is actively recruiting experts to fill out entries on East Asian religion. Entries may be written in Chinese OR English.

Benefits of Writing an Entry: Contribute to an international database on world history; Receive a publication credit; Honorarium available while funds last for complete entries finished within 60 days. 

Entry Requirements: Introductory paragraph (approx. 400 words); All quantitative questions answered; As many qualitative comments as possible (no set word count); Approximately 20-40 pdf pages (number will vary based on topic).

Contact Editor: Matthew Hamm (mattjhamm@gmail.com)

Editor, Archaeological East Asia: Katrinka Reinhart (reinhart@stanford.edu)

https://religiondatabase.org/landing/get-involved 

Introductory video: https://youtu.be/X7V0WNe2PrA

JOB POSTING: Associate Professor in Heritage Studies

Academic position as Associate Professor in Heritage Studies. 

Associate Professor in Heritage Studies, Grade 9, Full-time, UCL Institute of Archaeology , UCL Jobs Ref: 1877496

Role description: 

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is renowned as one of the world's leading centres of expertise for research and teaching in the fields of Museum Studies, Conservation, Cultural Heritage Studies and Public Archaeology. Staff and student's working in these areas comprise the Institute's Heritage Studies section.

The Associate Professor in Heritage Studies will be a member of staff at the UCL Institute of Archaeology but will also join the team delivering the new BA Heritage, a flagship multidisciplinary programme for UCL's new campus at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic park. UCL East will incorporate 12 academic entities with a range of new research and teaching programmes and collaborations with the other East Bank partners, including the V&A, the Smithsonian, Sadlers Wells and the BBC. One of these entities is the School for the Creative and Cultural Industries, within which the BA Heritage is situated.

AWARD: Bar Open access in Archaeology Award 2021

Closing date: 30th September 2021

Winner announced: 15th November 2021

BAR Publishing is celebrating the launch of its Open Access publishing programme with a new award worth up to £10,000. The BAR Open Access in Archaeology Award 2021 will consist of the free open access publication of the winning entry. An international panel of independent experts will be looking for the most innovative contribution to the field of archaeology. Panel members: Professor Timothy Darvill, Dr Hatoon al-Fassi, Dr Cat Jarman, Professor Innocent Pikirayi, Professor Claire Smith The award is a contract with BAR for the Open Access publication of the entry chosen by the judging panel. The winning manuscript will be peer-reviewed, copyedited, typeset and proofread. The OA book will be available for free download on the BAR Digital platform, on the BAR website, and on online repositories such as Google Scholar/Google Books, DOAB and OAPEN. A print version will also be available, and the author will receive 10 free print copies. Entrants whose manuscripts are shortlisted will receive support in developing their project further.

Vacancy for Project Curator: Reimagining the British Museum

Project Curator: Reimagining the British Museum Project
2 positions available
Collection Projects and Resources
Full-Time, Fixed-Term (23 Months, end date 21 June 2023)
£38,414 per annum
Application Deadline: 12pm on 8 July 2021

The British Museum is seeking two Project Curators to join a dedicated project team in the delivery of an exciting and complex new project to place global collaboration at the heart of the Museum’s new masterplan. The Reimagining the British Museum project will develop new curatorial approaches to interpreting the collection and developing the narratives that will underpin a comprehensive redisplay of the galleries.

In this role you will work with curators and other specialists across the organisation as well as individuals and groups around the world to develop curatorial briefs for new suites of permanent galleries. You will deliver pilot projects such as displays, and digital or other public programmes to test and evaluate different collaborative methods and narrative approaches, contributing to a clear plan and framework for how the Museum will collaborate globally in the development and delivery of its masterplan. Working beyond your own area of expertise or scholarly discipline, you will provide the right environment to stimulate new thinking and debate while balancing the need to meet challenging deadlines.

The start date of these posts is planned as the beginning of August 2021.

A toilet and other structures at the ruins of the ancient capital of Fujiwarakyo

POPULAR ARCHAEOLOGY: Parasite eggs in old toilet came from pork eaten 1,300 years ago

KASHIHARA, Nara Prefecture--Denizens of the Asuka Period (592-710) feasted on pork and may have done so routinely, archaeologists deduced from parasite eggs excavated from a toilet structure found in the ruins of the ancient capital of Fujiwarakyo. 

The eggs, which serve as scientific evidence of pork consumption because humans are infected with parasites after eating undercooked pork, are one of the oldest findings in the country, researchers from the Archaeological Institute of Kashihara, Nara Prefecture, reported. 

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