New fieldwork or research discoveries? Upcoming conference or workshop? New job opening or fellowship posting? New book?

Share the latest news of your work with your colleagues, advertise for job or fellowship openings, find participants for your conference session and more on the SEAA blog.

Guidelines: All posts should be related in some way to East Asian Archaeology. When writing your post, please use capital letters for surnames. Original script (Chinese, Korean, Japanese) for East Asian place names, personal names, or archaeological terms is encouraged. For the transcription of East Asian language terms, Pinyin for Chinese, Hepburn for Japanese, and the Korean Government System (2000) for Korean is encouraged.

Contributions should be limited to around 500 words and 1-2 images. For longer descriptions of your projects, you may consider the Reports section of the Bulletin (BSEAA).

Members can submit their news posts to the SEAA web editor via the website (see SEAA Members' Area for details and instructions on blog submissions) or via email. Non-member contributions are also welcome and may be submitted via email to the SEAA web editor.

The editor(s) reserves the right to carry out minor editing, or to decline contributions inappropriate to the objectives of SEAA.

Tibet book cover

New book: Tibetan Silver, Gold and Bronze Objects and the Aesthetics of Animals in the Era before Empire

This archaeological and art-historical study is woven around rock art and ancient metallic articles attributed to Tibet. The silver bowls, gold finial, and copper alloy spouted jars and trapezoidal plaques featured are assigned to the Iron Age and Protohistoric period. These rare objects are adorned with zoomorphic subjects mimicking those found in rock art and embody an artistic zeitgeist widely diffused in Central Eurasia in Late Prehistory. Diverse sources of inspiration and technological capability are revealed in these objects and rock art, shedding light on their transcultural dimension. The archaeological and aesthetic materials in this work prefigure the Tibetan cosmopolitanism of early historic times promoted through the spread of Buddhist ideas, art and craft from abroad. The metallic articles and petroglyphs of this study are markers of relationships between Tibet and her neighbours. These transactions enabled a fusion of Tibetan innovation and foreign inventiveness, a synthesis of disparate ideas, aesthetics and technologies in the objects and rock art presented.

University of Aberdeen Seal

Lecturer, University of Aberdeen - School of Geosciences

Archaeologists of Mongolia or other areas of northern East Asia take note!

Part of the School of Geosciences, the Department of Archaeology at Aberdeen is seeking support to deliver a wide-ranging Archaeology programme through the appointment of a Lecturer in Archaeology appointment. The position will replace Dr. Rick Knecht who has been awarded a prestigious Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship and will be on sabbatical for the duration of the appointment from Autumn 2020 for a period three years.

Applications are welcome from individuals with experience in teaching Archaeology, and who are ideally a specialist in the archaeology of northern regions, in fitting with our departmental ‘Archaeology of the North’ profile. Applications from candidates with an Arctic focus are particularly encouraged, aligning with Dr Knecht’s specialisms. Applications that demonstrate a practical fieldwork and/or lab-based element to their profile would also be desirable. The main responsibilities for the new Lecturer will include developing and delivering high quality undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Candidates should be experienced at communicating to a variety of different audiences, be able to work as part of a team, and be willing to work collaboratively with colleagues in Archaeology and other disciplines in the School and University.

The 16th Hakuhodo Foundation Japanese Research Fellowship - Now Accepting Applications

Hakuhodo Foundation is now accepting applications for the 16th Hakuhodo Foundation Japanese Research Fellowship.

The Fellowship invites leading international researchers of the Japanese language, Japanese language education, Japanese literature and Japanese culture to Japan to conduct residential research.
In providing residential research opportunities, the Fellowship aims to further strengthen the base of international research into Japan and to deepen the understanding of Japan.

1. Fellowship period(tentative):
   Long-term (12 months): September 1, 2021 - August 31, 2022
   Short-term (6 months): September 1, 2021 - February 28, 2022 (Round 1) or
                          March 1, 2022 - August 31, 2022 (Round 2)

2. Schedule:
   Application period: June 1 - October 30, 2020
   Notification: late March 2021(tentative)

Applications will be accepted online.
For further details, please visit our website or contact us at the address below.

Sarah Nelson Photo

Obituary for Sarah Nelson, Past President of SEAA

A personal tribute to Sarah Nelson

Gina L. Barnes

Sarah Milledge Nelson (1931–2020) reached the ripe old age of 88 and a half before she succumbed to the long-standing leukemia and late developing kidney problems that led to her death on April 27th. These did not keep her from attending a conference in Germany in January where we last met – I have never known anyone more adventurous and ready to travel. She admitted that her family motto was “Why not? … especially if the question has ‘go’ in it”!

Sarah put enormous amounts of energy into her chosen fields of, first, Korean archaeology, then northeastern Chinese archaeology, and finally into gender studies. In the first two, she has been a path-breaker, treading where few Western women were allowed to go. In the latter, she was a pioneer in challenging patriarchical organization of archaeology, publishing, and fieldwork through her entire career, culminating in her book on Shamans, Queens, and Figurines cited below. For those who want to hear about her life in her words, she gives extensive autobiographical contexts for each stage of her research in this book; they are an eye-opener to the hurdles she had to overcome in becoming one of the foremost East Asian archaeology scholars today. Moreover, they illustrate how serendipitous the development of research can be, where barriers and opportunities crop up in unexpected quarters – a good lesson for beginning students. I wish more of us would be as brave as Sarah to write about our career experiences, warts and all; they form important contexts for and constraints on the development of our thinking.

Call for SEAA Media Coordinator

Call for SEAA Media Coordinator

 The Society for East Asian Archaeology is currently looking for a volunteer Media Coordinator, whose responsibilities will include finding and collating news and announcements related to East Asian archaeology, and posting these on the SEAA blog and in a regular newsletter that will be distributed to the membership. We are looking for an enthusiastic, technology savvy undergraduate or graduate student who will work with our current web editor to fill this role.

Announcement: Shifting of SEAA Membership to 3-year, fixed term cycle

As the SEAA is now moving towards a 3-year conference cycle, we have also been in the process of updating our membership system to align with this change. This has now been implemented on the website for all new or renewing memberships. What this means in practical terms is that when you go to renew your membership, the options are now Regular and Concessionary 3-year fixed term. If you renew or join anytime this year, your membership will now last until December 31st, 2022. If you renew or join anytime in 2021, then your membership will last until December 31st, 2023, and so on.

Postdoctoral Research Associate - Encounter

Postdoctoral Research Associate - Encounter

A fixed term full-time postdoctoral appointment for 36 months is available to work on the ERC-funded project “Encounter: Demography, Cultural change, and the Diffusion of Rice and Millet during the Jomon-Yayoi transition in prehistoric Japan”. https://www.encounterproject.info/.  The role is for an analytical chemist or archaeological scientist to conduct lipid and protein residue analysis on Final Jomon and Early Yayoi ceramic vessels. You will generate data that will advance our understanding of the transition to farming in Japan. N.B. Prior doctoral training or equivalent experience in the field of organic residue analysis is highly desirable.

You will join the University of York’s world-renowned BioArCh group, where you will benefit from a highly multi-disciplinary and engaging working environment.  You will work closely with the residue analysis group under the direction of Prof. Oliver Craig, although you have your own remit within the project and the opportunity to complete first authored publications. You will be supported by our team of dedicated technicians and have access to all the instrumentation needed to undertake the research on site.  As part of this project, you may also be expected to make occasional visits to Japan to undertake sampling and dissemination of the results with the project partners, and to Cambridge where other team members are based. 

BE-ARCHAEO Summer School - Postponed

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS OPPROTUNITY HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO COVID-19

 

The first BE-ARCHAEO summer school is organized within the framework of MSCARISE BE-ARCHAEO project. It is addressed to PhD and postgraduate students in archaeology and related disciplines, as well as operators from archaeological museums, who are interested in the archaeology and proto-history of Japan and in the methodology of archaeological investigation. Participant will take part to lecture sessions with exercises, and a final workshop.

Forbidden City

Understanding Authenticity in China’s Cultural Heritage Conference at the University of Oxford, 28-30 May, 2020

Understanding Authenticity in China’s Cultural Heritage

Conference at the University of Oxford, 28-30 May, 2020

What we deem to be genuine or fake is not an objective determination, but something that we agree upon as communities. Debates about authenticity, moreover, are often intimately bound to question who owns the past and its representation. Please join us at Oxford on May 28th-30th, 2020, for a discussion on the construction of “authenticity,” both historically and today, in relation to China’s cultural heritage. 

Book cover

New Book: The Origin of Cattle in China from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age

Cattle (Bos taurus), domesticated from the extinct aurochs (Bos primigenius), has been an important animal to many human societies since prehistoric times. Cattle provides not only meat for subsistence, but also hide, blood, dung, milk and traction that contribute to the organization of human beliefs, cultural attitudes and social complexity. This book provides the widest range of cattle bone biometrical information from the Early Neolithic period to the Early Bronze Age (10000 to 3600 years ago) and investigates the morphological variation of this animal from a biological point of view: the main indicator for tracing domestication. The results suggest that cattle in ancient China was imported from the Near East around 4,300 years ago and made their first appearance in the Yellow River Valley. Once they had arrived in central China, these small-sized domesticated cattle soon spread and was exploited intensively from then on.

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