New fieldwork or research discoveries? Upcoming conference or workshop? New job opening or fellowship posting? New book?

Share the latest news of your work with your colleagues, advertise for job or fellowship openings, find participants for your conference session and more on the SEAA blog.

Guidelines: All posts should be related in some way to East Asian Archaeology. When writing your post, please use capital letters for surnames. Original script (Chinese, Korean, Japanese) for East Asian place names, personal names, or archaeological terms is encouraged. For the transcription of East Asian language terms, Pinyin for Chinese, Hepburn for Japanese, and the Korean Government System (2000) for Korean is encouraged.

Contributions should be limited to around 500 words and 1-2 images. For longer descriptions of your projects, you may consider the Reports section of the Bulletin (BSEAA).

Members can submit their news posts to the SEAA web editor via the website (see SEAA Members' Area for details and instructions on blog submissions) or via email. Non-member contributions are also welcome and may be submitted via email to the SEAA web editor.

The editor(s) reserves the right to carry out minor editing, or to decline contributions inappropriate to the objectives of SEAA.

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Coming soon!

Cover for Pillage is Prohibited conference

'Pillage is formally prohibited.' Provenance Research on East Asian Art #3

​​​Mesdames et Messieurs, chers collègues,​​

 

Nous sommes très heureux de vous faire parvenir le programme du premier atelier international de recherche 'Pillage is formally prohibited'. Provence Research on East Asian Art sur la translocation ​des objets chinois, japonais et coréens à l'Europe et aux Etats Unis qui aura lieu le 8 et 9 novembre 2019 au Musée d'art asiatique de Berlin (Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin). 


Nous serions très heureux d'accueillir de nombreux collègues français.
Veuillez vous inscrire sous cet email.

Avec nos salutations distinguées

SPENGLER, Robert N.: Fruit from the Sands The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat from University of California Press

The foods we eat have a deep and often surprising past. From almonds and apples to tea and rice, many foods that we consume today have histories that can be traced out of prehistoric Central Asia along the tracks of the Silk Road to kitchens in Europe, America, China, and elsewhere in East Asia. The exchange of goods, ideas, cultural practices, and genes along these ancient routes extends back five thousand years, and organized trade along the Silk Road dates to at least Han Dynasty China in the second century BC.

Introducing the New SEAA Website

Dear Members of the Society for East Asian Archaeology,

On behalf of the entire executive board, I would like to welcome you to the new home of the SEAA online. After many years of excellent service, we decided it was time for an update and change to a new website where members can easily find and discuss the latest news, discoveries, publications, and jobs related to the archaeology of East Asia. Along with the change in format, I’ll be serving as the new Web Editor. My name is Andrew Womack and I’m currently a postdoctoral scholar in Chinese Archaeology at Stanford University. I’ll be managing the transition to the new site as well as the new SEAA blog. The new website contains a number of improvements and new features, including:

TephroArchaeology in the North Pacific.  Archaeopress, Oxford 2019

BARNES, Gina L. / SODA Tsutomu (ed.): TephroArchaeology in the North Pacific. Archaeopress, Oxford 2019

‘TephroArchaeology’ is a translation of the Japanese word kazanbai kōkogaku (lit. volcanic ash archaeology), referring to a sub-discipline of archaeology that has developed in Japan in the last few decades. The first book compilation using the term, edited by the doyen of tephroarchaeology, geologist ARAI Fusao, appeared in 1993; chapters were written by 5 geologists, 3 archaeologists, 3 geographers, an engineer, and a historian. From its beginning, this subdiscipline has been interdisciplinary in approach and applied to all time periods throughout the Japanese Islands.

MÜLLER, Shing / HÖLLMANN, Thomas O. / FILIP, Sonja, Early Medieval North China: Archaeological and Textual Evidence, Harrasowitz 2019

The Xianbei from southeast Mongolia were the first foreign sovereignty over North China since the 4th century. During the 200 years of Xianbei rulership, the cultures of old and new inhabitants – the Han-Chinese, the Xianbei and diverse steppe peoples, the Sogdians and other Central Asians from the west – confronted and competed with one another.

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Membership can be considered for any individual, professional or non-professional, doing research related to the archaeology of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) or otherwise interested in the field. Please click the button above to sign up or renew now.