New fieldwork or research discoveries? Upcoming conference or workshop? New job opening or fellowship posting? New book?

Share the latest news of your work with your colleagues, advertise for job or fellowship openings, find participants for your conference session and more on the SEAA blog.

Guidelines: All posts should be related in some way to East Asian Archaeology. When writing your post, please use capital letters for surnames. Original script (Chinese, Korean, Japanese) for East Asian place names, personal names, or archaeological terms is encouraged. For the transcription of East Asian language terms, Pinyin for Chinese, Hepburn for Japanese, and the Korean Government System (2000) for Korean is encouraged.

Contributions should be limited to around 500 words and 1-2 images. For longer descriptions of your projects, you may consider the Reports section of the Bulletin (BSEAA).

Members can submit their news posts to the SEAA web editor via the website (see SEAA Members' Area for details and instructions on blog submissions) or via email. Non-member contributions are also welcome and may be submitted via email to the SEAA web editor.

The editor(s) reserves the right to carry out minor editing, or to decline contributions inappropriate to the objectives of SEAA.

Join the SAS Bulletin: Call for editors

From Carmen Ting, Editor for the Society for Archaeological Sciences Bulletin

I hope you have noticed and are pleased with the changes we have slowly implemented to the SAS bulletin over the past year. As promised in our last Annual General Meeting - which was also our very first virtual meeting, we are expanding our editorial team so that we can bring to you a broader spectrum of topics, truly reflecting the interdisciplinary of and innovation in our field. In addition to adding new blood, we are looking to replace one of most loyal contributors, Dr Charlie Kolb, who is stepping down from his role as the Associate Editor for Archaeological Ceramics due to personal reasons after serving the editorial board and the SAS in different capacities for decades. You will be sorely missed and there will be some big shoes to fill. Thus, we are currently looking to fill in the associate editors for the following areas:

Archaeological Ceramics (available from Spring 2021)

Bioarchaeology (available now)

Archaeobotany (available now)

Geoarchaeology (available now)

Remote Sensing and Prospection (available now)

IPPA logo

IPPA Congress 2022

The Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association has recently announced their upcoming conference, details of which are below. We would also like to congratualte Prof. Rasmi Shoocongdej, who has recently taken up the role of preident of IPPA!

About the conference:

The IPPA Executive Committee voted to support the Thailand proposal to host the 2022 IPPA Congress:

The Congress will be held at the Le Meridien Hotel, Chiang Mai from the 6th-12th November 2022. 

Eurasian Archaeology Seminar Symbol

Eurasian Archaeology Seminar Series

The Oxford Centre for Asian Archaeology, Art, and Culture presents the following speakers as part of its Eurasian Archaeology Seminar Series. Talks are open to everyone. To receive access details for the Zoom event or for any other questions please contact Dr. Anke Hein at anke.hein@arch.ox.ac.uk

Monday, 19 October, 2020, 16:00 BST, via MS Teams: Dylan Gaffney (University of Cambridge): Eurasia-Pacific trade connections from the Neolithic to the Dutch East India Company

Forbidden city wall

Understanding Authenticity in China’s Cultural Heritage Seminar Series

Seminar Series jointly organized by Oxford University and SOAS

Everyone is welcome to attend the following sessions: 

Wednesday, 21 October 2020, 11:00 BST
Zhang Lisheng and David Francis (UCL): Re-evaluating authenticity: Creativity in contemporary craft making in China

Wednesday, 28 October 2020, 12:00 BST
David Lebovitz (HKBU Jao Tsung-I Academy of Sinology): Was it really so, royal uncles? Notions of authenticity in the reception, redaction and reconstruction of some avuncular remonstrations.

VISITING RESEARCH SCHOLAR PROGRAM - Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW), NYU

Editor's note: while these positions are not East Asia specific, several East Asia-focused scholars have held them in recent years, so it is worth applying. https://isaw.nyu.edu/visiting-scholars

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) is a center for advanced scholarly research and graduate education, which aims to encourage particularly the study of the economic, religious, political and cultural connections between ancient civilizations. In an effort to embrace a truly inclusive geographical scope while maintaining continuity and coherence, the Institute focuses on the shared and overlapping periods in the development of cultures and civilizations around the Mediterranean basin, and across central Asia to the Pacific Ocean. The approaches of anthropology, archaeology, geography, geology, history, economics, sociology, art history, digital humanities, and the history of science and technology are as integral to the enterprise as the study of texts, philosophy, and the analysis of artifacts.

ISAW anticipates appointing visiting scholars in several different categories for the 2021-22 academic year. Applicants in all categories should be individuals of scholarly distinction or promise in any relevant field of ancient studies who will benefit from the stimulation of working in an environment with colleagues in other disciplines. Scholars with a history of interdisciplinary exchange and scholars whose academic interests include parts of the ancient Old World that are often underrepresented in traditional academic departments, including Africa, Central Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, are especially welcome and encouraged to apply.

Research Assistant, Archaeological Database of China, collaborated by Tsinghua University and Hong Kong University

The Archaeological Database of China, collaborated by Tsinghua University and Hong Kong University, is looking for a research assistant to help curate data from the second phase of its project. Successful applicants would work on archaeological materials from the Neolithic to the Northern and Southern dynasties. Please note that work would be conducted entirely in Chinese. As such, applications should have high fluency in the Chinese language.

Research Fellow in Chinese History, Academia Sinica

Research Fellow Position at Academia Sinica

1. Rank: Assistant Research Fellow (1 position available)

2. Areas of Specialization: Chinese History

3. Qualifications:

(1) Applicants with a domestic or foreign doctorate degree recognized by the Ministry of Education; or applicants scheduled to receive a domestic or foreign doctorate degree in related fields by June 30, 2021
(2) For foreign applicants, the ability to speak and write (fluently) in Mandarin is preferred.

The said wooden spinning top

Discoveries: Japan’s oldest spinning top recently uncovered in ancient settlement with links to Korean immigrants

What is likely to be Japan’s oldest spinning tip was recently unearthed in the Minami-Shiga archaeological site in Otsu, Shiga Prefecture. The site was thought to have been inhabited by immigrants from the Korean Peninsula. The top was unearthed together with other ceremonial items such as sacred spikes and peach seeds. Judging from pottery sherds found in the same ditch, the wooden spinning top, dates to the late Kofun period, which lasted from the late 6th to early 7th century.

NEW BOOK: Drawn and Written in Stone: An Inventory of Stepped Shrines and Early Rock Inscriptions in Upper Tibet (ca. 100 BCE to 1400 CE)

Author: John Vincent Bellezza 

Synopsis 

Drawn and Written in Stone explores the religious history of the highest part of the Tibetan Plateau through its rock art and inscriptions. It is focused on facsimiles of ritual and ceremonial monuments carved and painted on stone surfaces and rock inscriptions in the Tibetan language, vital archaeological and historical materials for appraising the development of religion in Tibet, ca. 100 BCE to 1400 CE. By probing the complexion of figures and letters in stone, this work considers how early cult traditions contributed to the establishment of Tibetan Buddhism and a rival faith known as Yungdrung Bon. Outside of the Indian cultural context, relatively little has been written about the historical antecedents of these popular Tibetan religions for a want of sources. This monograph helps remedy this large gap in Tibetan studies by drawing upon the author’s surveys of rock art and rock inscriptions conducted in upmost Tibet between 1995 and 2013. 

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