A Han Dynasty bronze mirror from the Royal Ontario Museum collections.

About SEAA-web

SEAA-web is an information platform dedicated to communicating the activities of the Society for East Asian Archaeology (SEAA), to spreading news of upcoming events and note-worthies in the field to members and the interested public, and to publishing and sharing information on research based on archaeologically recovered material comprising China, Korea, Japan and adjacent regions in all periods, thus aiming at further fostering a network of expertise in East Asian archaeology. The SEAA-web is a non-profit project.

SEAA News Blog

Liangzhu ad

Volunteers needed for interview on creation of digital Liangzhu culture platform

Liangzhu Culture Management Committee and Shanghai Jiaotong University are currently working on a digital project for the archaeological ruins of Liangzhu city in China, which was inscribed on WHL last year. In order to create user-friendly digital platforms, we’re looking for non-Chinese culture lovers who have been to or are currently residing in mainland China to attend paid interviews. If you're interested in participating, please find more info on the flyer here.

BAR text

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: BAR Archaeology of East Asia

Archaeology of East Asia

New specialist sub series

Series Editors:  Anke Hein (Oxford)

In recent years, the archaeology of East Asia has been receiving increasing interest among scholars world-wide, leading to an upsurge in publications in western languages as well as an increase of presentations and panels on that topic at international archaeological conferences. This series offers a venue to publish archaeological material and in-depth analyses that can provide a greater audience access to evidence previously unpublished or only accessible through articles in not-easily-accessible venues or languages. The series provides a platform for data-rich studies on a variety of topics and materials from all over East Asia as well as conference proceedings reflecting the newest research insights and trends. We encourage projects that cross-national borders even into adjoining regions and/or cover areas usually overlooked in main-stream research. This includes all parts of China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, the Russian Far East, the Tibetan Plateau as a whole, and the northern reaches of Southeast Asia. Especially encouraged are submissions proposing and conducting new approaches and methods in all aspects of archaeology including scientific techniques, spatial analysis, various digital methods, but also theory and model-based or traditional chronology-focused studies.

Postdoctoral Scholar Position: Geosciences Research Division (GRD), Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Although not specifically focused on East Asia, this position is sponsored by an East Asia specialist and therefore may be of interest: 

Reconstruction of Holocene Temperature and Precipitation

The Geosciences Research Division (GRD) at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography has an opening starting in 2020 for one Postdoctoral Scholar. The candidate will work on a project to develop a new reconstruction of Holocene temperature and precipitation in the d’Alpoim Guedes Laboratory. The objective is to create and update a database of paleoclimate proxies and downscaling these records to provide a high-resolution map of the impact of changing precipitation and temperature on the ability of different cultivars to complete their lifecycle. Overall, the objective is that these models will be integrated with population genomic data as well as data on archaeological site timing and distribution.

Tibet book cover

New book: Tibetan Silver, Gold and Bronze Objects and the Aesthetics of Animals in the Era before Empire

This archaeological and art-historical study is woven around rock art and ancient metallic articles attributed to Tibet. The silver bowls, gold finial, and copper alloy spouted jars and trapezoidal plaques featured are assigned to the Iron Age and Protohistoric period. These rare objects are adorned with zoomorphic subjects mimicking those found in rock art and embody an artistic zeitgeist widely diffused in Central Eurasia in Late Prehistory. Diverse sources of inspiration and technological capability are revealed in these objects and rock art, shedding light on their transcultural dimension. The archaeological and aesthetic materials in this work prefigure the Tibetan cosmopolitanism of early historic times promoted through the spread of Buddhist ideas, art and craft from abroad. The metallic articles and petroglyphs of this study are markers of relationships between Tibet and her neighbours. These transactions enabled a fusion of Tibetan innovation and foreign inventiveness, a synthesis of disparate ideas, aesthetics and technologies in the objects and rock art presented.

University of Aberdeen Seal

Lecturer, University of Aberdeen - School of Geosciences

Archaeologists of Mongolia or other areas of northern East Asia take note!

Part of the School of Geosciences, the Department of Archaeology at Aberdeen is seeking support to deliver a wide-ranging Archaeology programme through the appointment of a Lecturer in Archaeology appointment. The position will replace Dr. Rick Knecht who has been awarded a prestigious Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship and will be on sabbatical for the duration of the appointment from Autumn 2020 for a period three years.

Applications are welcome from individuals with experience in teaching Archaeology, and who are ideally a specialist in the archaeology of northern regions, in fitting with our departmental ‘Archaeology of the North’ profile. Applications from candidates with an Arctic focus are particularly encouraged, aligning with Dr Knecht’s specialisms. Applications that demonstrate a practical fieldwork and/or lab-based element to their profile would also be desirable. The main responsibilities for the new Lecturer will include developing and delivering high quality undergraduate and postgraduate teaching. Candidates should be experienced at communicating to a variety of different audiences, be able to work as part of a team, and be willing to work collaboratively with colleagues in Archaeology and other disciplines in the School and University.

SEAA Membership

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Membership can be considered for any individual, professional or non-professional, doing research related to the archaeology of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) or otherwise interested in the field. Please click the button above to sign up or renew now.

President's Message

Welcome to the website of SEAA, the Society for East Asian Archaeology. Established in 1996 and now counting some 500 international members, SEAA is the preeminent organization devoted to the promotion of the field of East Asian archaeology and the facilitation of scholarly exchange among archaeologists of the region.