A Han Dynasty bronze mirror from the Royal Ontario Museum collections.

About SEAA-web

SEAA-web is an information platform dedicated to communicating the activities of the Society for East Asian Archaeology (SEAA), to spreading news of upcoming events and note-worthies in the field to members and the interested public, and to publishing and sharing information on research based on archaeologically recovered material comprising China, Korea, Japan and adjacent regions in all periods, thus aiming at further fostering a network of expertise in East Asian archaeology. The SEAA-web is a non-profit project.

SEAA News Blog

Sarah Nelson Photo

Obituary for Sarah Nelson, Past President of SEAA

A personal tribute to Sarah Nelson

Gina L. Barnes

Sarah Milledge Nelson (1931–2020) reached the ripe old age of 88 and a half before she succumbed to the long-standing leukemia and late developing kidney problems that led to her death on April 27th. These did not keep her from attending a conference in Germany in January where we last met – I have never known anyone more adventurous and ready to travel. She admitted that her family motto was “Why not? … especially if the question has ‘go’ in it”!

Sarah put enormous amounts of energy into her chosen fields of, first, Korean archaeology, then northeastern Chinese archaeology, and finally into gender studies. In the first two, she has been a path-breaker, treading where few Western women were allowed to go. In the latter, she was a pioneer in challenging patriarchical organization of archaeology, publishing, and fieldwork through her entire career, culminating in her book on Shamans, Queens, and Figurines cited below. For those who want to hear about her life in her words, she gives extensive autobiographical contexts for each stage of her research in this book; they are an eye-opener to the hurdles she had to overcome in becoming one of the foremost East Asian archaeology scholars today. Moreover, they illustrate how serendipitous the development of research can be, where barriers and opportunities crop up in unexpected quarters – a good lesson for beginning students. I wish more of us would be as brave as Sarah to write about our career experiences, warts and all; they form important contexts for and constraints on the development of our thinking.

Call for SEAA Media Coordinator

Call for SEAA Media Coordinator

 The Society for East Asian Archaeology is currently looking for a volunteer Media Coordinator, whose responsibilities will include finding and collating news and announcements related to East Asian archaeology, and posting these on the SEAA blog and in a regular newsletter that will be distributed to the membership. We are looking for an enthusiastic, technology savvy undergraduate or graduate student who will work with our current web editor to fill this role.

Announcement: Shifting of SEAA Membership to 3-year, fixed term cycle

As the SEAA is now moving towards a 3-year conference cycle, we have also been in the process of updating our membership system to align with this change. This has now been implemented on the website for all new or renewing memberships. What this means in practical terms is that when you go to renew your membership, the options are now Regular and Concessionary 3-year fixed term. If you renew or join anytime this year, your membership will now last until December 31st, 2022. If you renew or join anytime in 2021, then your membership will last until December 31st, 2023, and so on.

Postdoctoral Research Associate - Encounter

Postdoctoral Research Associate - Encounter

A fixed term full-time postdoctoral appointment for 36 months is available to work on the ERC-funded project “Encounter: Demography, Cultural change, and the Diffusion of Rice and Millet during the Jomon-Yayoi transition in prehistoric Japan”. https://www.encounterproject.info/.  The role is for an analytical chemist or archaeological scientist to conduct lipid and protein residue analysis on Final Jomon and Early Yayoi ceramic vessels. You will generate data that will advance our understanding of the transition to farming in Japan. N.B. Prior doctoral training or equivalent experience in the field of organic residue analysis is highly desirable.

You will join the University of York’s world-renowned BioArCh group, where you will benefit from a highly multi-disciplinary and engaging working environment.  You will work closely with the residue analysis group under the direction of Prof. Oliver Craig, although you have your own remit within the project and the opportunity to complete first authored publications. You will be supported by our team of dedicated technicians and have access to all the instrumentation needed to undertake the research on site.  As part of this project, you may also be expected to make occasional visits to Japan to undertake sampling and dissemination of the results with the project partners, and to Cambridge where other team members are based. 

BE-ARCHAEO Summer School - Postponed

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS OPPROTUNITY HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO COVID-19

 

The first BE-ARCHAEO summer school is organized within the framework of MSCARISE BE-ARCHAEO project. It is addressed to PhD and postgraduate students in archaeology and related disciplines, as well as operators from archaeological museums, who are interested in the archaeology and proto-history of Japan and in the methodology of archaeological investigation. Participant will take part to lecture sessions with exercises, and a final workshop.

SEAA Membership

Join or Renew

Membership can be considered for any individual, professional or non-professional, doing research related to the archaeology of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) or otherwise interested in the field. Please click the button above to sign up or renew now.

President's Message

Welcome to the website of SEAA, the Society for East Asian Archaeology. Established in 1996 and now counting some 500 international members, SEAA is the preeminent organization devoted to the promotion of the field of East Asian archaeology and the facilitation of scholarly exchange among archaeologists of the region.