A Han Dynasty bronze mirror from the Royal Ontario Museum collections.

About SEAA-web

SEAA-web is an information platform dedicated to communicating the activities of the Society for East Asian Archaeology (SEAA), to spreading news of upcoming events and note-worthies in the field to members and the interested public, and to publishing and sharing information on research based on archaeologically recovered material comprising China, Korea, Japan and adjacent regions in all periods, thus aiming at further fostering a network of expertise in East Asian archaeology. The SEAA-web is a non-profit project.

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Postdoctoral Research Associate - Encounter

Postdoctoral Research Associate - Encounter

A fixed term full-time postdoctoral appointment for 36 months is available to work on the ERC-funded project “Encounter: Demography, Cultural change, and the Diffusion of Rice and Millet during the Jomon-Yayoi transition in prehistoric Japan”. https://www.encounterproject.info/.  The role is for an analytical chemist or archaeological scientist to conduct lipid and protein residue analysis on Final Jomon and Early Yayoi ceramic vessels. You will generate data that will advance our understanding of the transition to farming in Japan. N.B. Prior doctoral training or equivalent experience in the field of organic residue analysis is highly desirable.

You will join the University of York’s world-renowned BioArCh group, where you will benefit from a highly multi-disciplinary and engaging working environment.  You will work closely with the residue analysis group under the direction of Prof. Oliver Craig, although you have your own remit within the project and the opportunity to complete first authored publications. You will be supported by our team of dedicated technicians and have access to all the instrumentation needed to undertake the research on site.  As part of this project, you may also be expected to make occasional visits to Japan to undertake sampling and dissemination of the results with the project partners, and to Cambridge where other team members are based. 

BE-ARCHAEO Summer School

The first BE-ARCHAEO summer school is organized within the framework of MSCARISE BE-ARCHAEO project. It is addressed to PhD and postgraduate students in archaeology and related disciplines, as well as operators from archaeological museums, who are interested in the archaeology and proto-history of Japan and in the methodology of archaeological investigation. Participant will take part to lecture sessions with exercises, and a final workshop.

Main topics Main topics are:

Forbidden City

Understanding Authenticity in China’s Cultural Heritage Conference at the University of Oxford, 28-30 May, 2020

Understanding Authenticity in China’s Cultural Heritage

Conference at the University of Oxford, 28-30 May, 2020

What we deem to be genuine or fake is not an objective determination, but something that we agree upon as communities. Debates about authenticity, moreover, are often intimately bound to question who owns the past and its representation. Please join us at Oxford on May 28th-30th, 2020, for a discussion on the construction of “authenticity,” both historically and today, in relation to China’s cultural heritage. 

Book cover

New Book: The Origin of Cattle in China from the Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age

Cattle (Bos taurus), domesticated from the extinct aurochs (Bos primigenius), has been an important animal to many human societies since prehistoric times. Cattle provides not only meat for subsistence, but also hide, blood, dung, milk and traction that contribute to the organization of human beliefs, cultural attitudes and social complexity. This book provides the widest range of cattle bone biometrical information from the Early Neolithic period to the Early Bronze Age (10000 to 3600 years ago) and investigates the morphological variation of this animal from a biological point of view: the main indicator for tracing domestication. The results suggest that cattle in ancient China was imported from the Near East around 4,300 years ago and made their first appearance in the Yellow River Valley. Once they had arrived in central China, these small-sized domesticated cattle soon spread and was exploited intensively from then on.

Wang book cover.

New Book: A Zooarchaeological Study of the Haimenkou Site, Yunnan Province, China

Haimenkou was an important location, with trade and cultural links connecting parts of modern Southeast Asia and northwestern China in ancient times. This book is based on an analysis of the faunal assemblage recovered from the Haimenkou site during the 2008 field season in Yunnan Province, China. It investigates the human-animal relationships at Haimenkou through a time span running from the late Neolithic Period to the middle Bronze Age (ca. 5000-2400 BP).

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Membership can be considered for any individual, professional or non-professional, doing research related to the archaeology of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan) or otherwise interested in the field. Please click the button above to sign up or renew now.

President's Message

Welcome to the website of SEAA, the Society for East Asian Archaeology. Established in 1996 and now counting some 500 international members, SEAA is the preeminent organization devoted to the promotion of the field of East Asian archaeology and the facilitation of scholarly exchange among archaeologists of the region.