New fieldwork or research discoveries? Upcoming conference or workshop? New job opening or fellowship posting? New book?

Share the latest news of your work with your colleagues, advertise for job or fellowship openings, find participants for your conference session and more on the SEAA blog.

Guidelines: All posts should be related in some way to East Asian Archaeology. When writing your post, please use capital letters for surnames. Original script (Chinese, Korean, Japanese) for East Asian place names, personal names, or archaeological terms is encouraged. For the transcription of East Asian language terms, Pinyin for Chinese, Hepburn for Japanese, and the Korean Government System (2000) for Korean is encouraged.

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Book cover

NEW BOOK: The Oxford Handbook of Early China

The Oxford Handbook of Early China

Edited by Elizabeth Childs-Johnson

The Oxford Handbook on Early China brings 30 scholars together to cover early China from the Neolithic through Warring States periods (ca 5000-500BCE). The study is chronological and incorporates a multidisciplinary approach, covering topics from archaeology, anthropology, art history, architecture, music, and metallurgy, to literature, religion, paleography, cosmology, religion, prehistory, and history.

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-oxford-handbook-of-early-chi...

Online Survey: Save Ancient Studies Alliance

5-minute Survey to Save Ancient Studies

Save Ancient Studies in America (SASA) is a non-profit organization that was founded in early 2020 as a reaction to the devaluation of the study of the ancient world in universities and high schools. Our director, David Danzig, and a group of 30 graduate students and early career scholars from leading universities around the world came together to build a platform to increase exposure, inspire engagement, and provide access to the study of the ancient world.

As part of SASA’s research project on the Downward Trend in Ancient Studies, we are working on understanding what draws people into Ancient Studies. Please spend 5 minutes to take this survey and help us work toward saving Ancient Studies. The results of this survey will help us analyze the variety of paths into our fields and to thereby better target SASA’s strategies for engaging young adults in the ancient world and attracting new students. 

Survey link: >>>>>  https://www.saveancientstudies.org/survey  <<<<<

Virtual Lecture Series at Indiana University - On Altars of Soil: Unearthing New Narratives in Early Chinese History

Familiarity with unearthed materials has become the norm among scholars of early China across the world. The field has come to re‐examine narratives of early Chinese history in a more nuanced way, moving beyond questions of “doubting” or “verifying antiquity” to detail how the situation on the ground in early China related to its representation in traditional historical constructs. The fruits of this process are undeniable. Confronting entrenched historical narratives through archaeology, however, has widespread methodological and epistemological implications. Unquestioned, traditional narratives can distract scholars from the motivations of ancient actors; moreover, they can limit the broad humanistic value of early China scholarship and its reception outside the field. Unchecked, however, the incautious deconstruction of such narratives can cast pointless doubt on well-founded networks of knowledge. Further, deploying unearthed material in historiography brings the narratological habits of history into contact with the customs of field archaeology, raising both practical problems of data management and theoretical issues about the production of knowledge about the past.  

Understanding Authenticity in China’s Cultural Heritage

Understanding Authenticity in China’s Cultural Heritage

Conference at the University of Oxford, 16-20 March, 2021

Organized by Christopher Foster and Anke Hein

Contact: understandingauthenticity@gmail.com

What we deem to be genuine or fake is not an objective determination, but something that we agree upon as communities. Debates about authenticity, moreover, are often intimately bound to question who owns the past and its representation. The “Understanding Authenticity in China’s Cultural Heritage” conference this March will explore these issues and more. From contesting narratives about the mother trees of Big Red Robe tea, to the restoration of Qin terracotta soldiers; from the experience of visiting a replica Eiffel Tower in Hangzhou, to US-China diplomatic tensions over "originality" and "shanzhai 山寨 (imitation)” – "Understanding Authenticity in China's Cultural Heritage” brings together specialists from a broad range of fields and backgrounds, to explore how questions about “authenticity” impact their work on objects, texts, and intangible cultural heritage in China.

Please join us online March 16th- 20st, 2021, for a discussion on the construction of “authenticity,” both historically and today, in relation to China’s cultural heritage. Registration is free, attendance is open to all, via submission of a short survey at the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/X8T7T2C

 

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