SEAA

SEAA Society for East Asian Archaeology

 

 

Download final program as pdf

 

 

 

 

DAY:         Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5

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Poster Session: ABCDE

 

 

DAY 1: June 8, Wednesday (at Harvard University)

 

 

Northwest China Neolithic Archaeology Study Session

In association with an exhibit of painted Neolithic pottery from Northwest China in the Harvard Art Museums that has been put together by Dr. Ling-yu Hung (Indiana University and Harvard University, Fairbank Center), this two hour study session examines some of the Northwest China painted Neolithic pottery in the collection that is not in the exhibit. The session will be led by Dr. Hung and Dr. Li Shuicheng (Peking University). Pre-registration required.

Ainu Collection Study Session

In conjunction with the Harvard Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, this two hour study session examines 18th and 19th century Ainu materials held in the Peabody Museum. This session will explore the history of Ainu collections in American museums, as well as the roles and responsibilities of archaeologists in researching these collections. This session will be led by Zoe Eddy (Harvard University Department of Anthropology PhD student, Smithsonian Institution Visiting Researcher). Pre-registration required.

 

Opening Ceremony

Rowan FLAD (Dept. of Anthropology, Harvard; Local Organizer, SEAA7)

Welcome

• Yangjin PAK (President, Society for East Asian Archaeology)

• Mark ELLIOTT (Vice Provost for International Affairs, Harvard University)

• Deborah Martin KAO (Chief Curator and Interim Co-Director, Harvard Art Museums)

• Jane PICKERING (Executive Director, Harvard Museums of Science and Culture)

• Karen THORNBER (Director, Harvard University Asia Center)

• Theodore C. BESTOR (Director, Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard)

• Michael SZONY (Director, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard)

• Susan LAURENCE (Executive Director, Korea Institute, Harvard)

• LI Ruohong (Executive Director, Harvard-Yenching Institute)

 

Plenary Session

Robert E. MUROWCHICK (Dept. of Archaeology, and ICEAACH, Boston University, Local Co-Organizer, SEAA7)

Ofer BAR-YOSEF (Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, Harvard University): Early Cultivation in China: Why and Where

David REICH (Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School): Ancient DNA Documents Multiple Human Migrations into the South Pacific

Richard MEADOW (Senior Lecturer in Anthropology and Director of the Zooarchaeology Laboratory, Harvard Peabody Museum): Traveling East: Domestic Zebu Cattle and Water Buffalo reach China

Mark BYINGTON (Director, Early Korea Project, Harvard Korea Institute): A Retrospective on Harvard’s Early Korea Project

Rowan FLAD (Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University): Technological Change on the Proto-Silk Road

Michael PUETT (Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University): Excavating Ritual

Eugene WANG (Professor of the History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University): The First Emperor’s Tomb site: What was the Design?

Katherine EREMIN (Conservation Scientist, Strauss Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, Harvard University): Dunhuang Treasures at the Harvard Art Museums through the Conservation Lens

Ricardo ELIA (Associate Professor of Archaeology, Boston University): Japanese Appropriation of Cultural Heritage during the Pacific War, 1937-1945

Robert MUROWCHICK (Director, International Center for East Asian Archaeology and Cultural History, Boston University): Death by a Thousand Cuts: Can China’s Remaining Cultural Heritage be Preserved?

Barbara FASH (Director of the Corpus of Maya Hieroglyphic Inscriptions Program, Harvard University): Innovation and Education: A Circle of Archaeological Community in Copan, Honduras

Kay UEDA (Post-Doctoral Researcher, International Center for East Asian Archaeology and Cultural History, Boston University): When Southeast Asia went Global: Historical Archaeology from an Asian Perspective

CLOSING

 

WELCOME RECEPTION

 


 

DAY 2: June 9, Thursday (at Harvard University)

 

 

Morning

 

I  Beyond Typology: New Approaches to Ceramic Analysis in Chinese Archaeology

Organizers: Yitzchak JAFFE / WEI Qiaowei

From the earliest ceramics found in the Paleolithic caves of Yuchisi and Xianrendong to painted Yangshao fish motifs, Longshan eggshell-thin drinking cups and the ubiquitous blue-grey Han dynasty tiles, pottery comprises some of the most impressive artifacts of ancient China and provides the basic elements for its study. To date, most research has focused on shapes and styles of ceramic vessels to construct cultural typologies, but in the past few years studies have begun to embrace the immense potential that ceramic data contain and the wide range of social and technical information that can be extracted from ceramics. This session will bring together scholars to present their innovative research and fresh approaches to the study of pottery in Chinese archaeology. Papers will address both novel analytical techniques of ceramic assemblages and studies that present new data on craft specialization, politics and culinary practices.

Yitzchak JAFFE: Cooking on the side—Use Wear Analysis of Siwa Saddle-shaped Mouth Jars from the site of Zhangqi [1]

WEI Qiaowei, ZHAO Yichao: Made Locally or Long Distance Transportation? New Evidence on Ceramic Vessels from Salt Production Sites in Northern Shandong [2]

Ilaria PATANIA: FTIR Analysis of Clays at Xianrendong Cave: Reconstructing Pyrotechnology and Human Behavior in the Home [3]

 Anke HEIN: The Typological Orientation of Chinese Archaeology—A Reassessment of Methods and Problems [4]

 ZENG Lingyi: Ceramic Production, Consumption and Exchange During the Yuan Dynasty (1271–1368 AD), China [5]

Anne UNDERHILL: Discussant [6]

 

II Tracing Medieval Connections in Japan: Trade, Urban Development, and Seafaring

Organizer: Michelle DAMIAN

While many Japanese historical archaeological studies have focused on temple, castle, or palace sites, the studies here explore the development of and connections between lesser known locales: specifically, urban settlements and ports. These smaller communities reflect the daily activities of the late medieval (14th – 17th centuries) Japanese, and reveal multiple connections with other communities both within and without the archipelago. Through the use of archaeological evidence, geospatial analysis, and artistic depictions, the authors examine the factors that impacted domestic and interregional trade, particularly via maritime routes. As we determine trade-based connections, we further see the ramifications of those ties on daily life in coastal and urban communities. Finally, we examine the perception of outside influences as new connections with the west are forged.

 Michelle DAMIAN: Currents, Islands, and Pirates—A Geospatial Analysis of Medieval Trade in the Seto Inland Sea [7]

 Simon KANER: The Archaeology of Sea-borne Trade and Urbanism along the Medieval Japan Sea Coast [8]

 YAMAFUNE Kotarō: Archaeology and Art: Portuguese Ships in Japanese Perspectives [9]

MARUYAMA Masashi, Kenji NAGAI, Yumiko OYABU, Shiori FUJISAWA: Changes in Cut Marks on Animal Remains from Prehistory to the Historical Age in Japan [10]

 

III Prospect for Multidisciplinary Studies in East Asia Bioarchaeology

Organizers: ZHANG Hua / KIKUCHI Hiroko

Along with artifacts, archaeological excavations have unearthed many kinds of biological remains, including human, faunal, and floral. These organic materials provide an essential foundation for reconstructing past human societies and interpreting lifeways of past people. Recently, based in the domain of science, the application of advanced techniques such as chemical and physical tests, and isotope and ancient DNA analyses, is largely involved in studies that address specific hypotheses and questions about past human behaviour. Here we use the broader concept of bioarchaeology to cover all biological remains from archaeological sites, and present ten studies in East Asia, focusing on China and Japan. As the most promising area of research, bioarchaeology is moving forward with multidisciplinary collaborations in the study of human past.

Daniela WOLIN, Christina CHEUNG, ZHANG Hua: The Lives of Commoners and Sacrificial Victims of Late Shang in Anyang, China: New Evidence from Paleopathology and Palaeodiet [11]

OKAZAKI Kenji, YONEMOTO S., NAKAHASHI T., MIYAMOTO K., AMGALANTUGS T.: Trauma on the Human Skeletal Remains of the Bronze Age, Mongolia [12]

Mauricio HERNANDEZ: Ecology, Subsistence and Cultural Admixture: A Biomechanical Reconstruction of Routine Activities across Northwest China's Prehistoric Exchange Networks [13]

 WEI Dong, YANG Si: A Regional Investigation of Activity-related Stress and Trauma in Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Human Remains in Xinjiang, China [14]

 EDA Masaki, LU Peng, LUO Yunbing, YUAN Jing: The Morphological Microevolution of Chickens in East Asia during the Domestication Process: A Statistical Point of View [15]

KIKUCHI Hiroki: Evolution of Horse Production and Management System in Ancient China [16]

 GAKUHARI Takashi: Bioisoscape Analysis for Zooarchaeological Research of Horse Production System and Evolution in East Asia [17]

 ZHAO Xin: Ancient DNA Studies on Domesticated Cattle in Northern China [18]

 ZHANG Zhe: Mass Procurement and Feasting in Houtaomuga, Northeast China [19]

 WANG Chunxue: Identification of Adhesive on Bone-handled Microblades from the Houtaomuga Site in Northeast China [20]

NIE Ying: The Study of Oral Health of Semi-nomadic Populations from the Late Bronze Age to Early Iron Age in Yili River, Xinjiang, China [21]

 

IV  Role of Archaeologists in Heritage Management in East Asia

Organizers: Jada KO / EDDY Zoe

Heritage is fast becoming a topic central in archaeological theory and practice. This session examines heritage management and conservation within the context of East Asian archaeology. Within this context, we will interrogate questions such as “What is heritage?” and “Who does heritage belong to?” The goals of this session are a) to examine how heritage management is currently practiced in East Asia, and b) to raise awareness of this topic among East Asian archaeologists. Contributors will present a range of papers that discuss theoretical approaches to East Asian heritage management, case studies, projects, and programs; a subset of papers will discuss specifically the impact of archaeology and heritage on local, indigenous, and minority ethnic populations. This session aims to encourage discussions on the current issues surrounding the preservation and sharing of the past, as well as the difference between viewing heritage as a process and as a product.

Jada KO: Heritage, Landscape, and Local Communities: A New form of Public Archaeology in China – A Case Study in Gansu [22]

LI Jian: Changes in the Role of the Chinese Government in Cultural Heritage Protection [23]

EDDY Zoe: Colonizing Ainu Anthropology: A Historical Inquiry of Outsider Perspectives [24]

 TONG Shan: Should They Move Out? A Case Study of Southern China's Cave-Dwelling Heritage Protection: Rethinking the Indigenous Cultural Heritage Protection in China [25]

 

V General Session: Complex Society/Early China

Chair: Katherine BRUNSON

 DAI Xiangming: Development of Social Complexity in the Late Neolithic of Northern China [27]

 Katherine BRUNSON: Ancient DNA Approaches to Zooarchaeological Research in China [28]

 REN Xinyu: A Regional Perspective on the Rise of Social Complexity in Prehistoric China: The Huangtucheng Regional Archaeological Survey in the Huai River Region [29]

 WANG Wenjing: The Development of Early Complex Society in the Chaohu Area, Middle-Lower Reaches of the Yangzi River, China [30]

SONG Haichao: A Social Complexity Study of the Liangzhu Site [31]

 

VI General Session: Burial Objects/Ornaments in East Asia

Chair: Yoko NISHIMURA

Yoko NISHIMURA: The Process of Magatama Beads in Mortuary Contexts of Jōmon Japan [32]

YOSHIDA Yasuyuki: Spatial Analysis of Jomon Ear Ornaments: Toward Diverse Interpretations [33]

QIN Xiaoli: Inter-regional Relationships in the Hemudu Culture to Liangzhu Culture Periods: A View from the Distribution Pattern of Beads in East China [34]

 HUANG Chao: Jade Yazhang Blades of the Phung Nguyen Culture in Northern Vietnam and Relations with China [35]

 ZHANG Lei: A Brief Analysis of the Evolution of Bird Design in Ancient Chinese Headwear [36]

 

VII Rediscovering East Asia in the Penn Museum: New Light on an Old Collection

Organizer: Adam SMITH

The session brings together five papers devoted to East Asian objects in the collection of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. As with many collections assembled in the first half of the 20th c., the Penn Asia collection looks in many respects very different from how it appeared at the time of its acquisition, and is ripe for rediscovery. For items that entered the collection over 50 years ago, the archaeological evidence and research on comparable material that has accumulated in the interim often demands that old interpretations be revisited. In some cases—as with the Mayer Northern Zone bronzes, and Xiuding Si architectural tiles, discussed in three papers in the session—significant material has gone largely unnoticed.

 Adam SMITH: Contextualizing Northern Dynasties Donor Inscriptions in the Penn Museum [37]

 Gabrielle NIU: Tiles from the Xiudingsi Pagoda at the Penn Museum: Petrographic Analysis and Art History [38]

 CHENG Fangyi: The Mayer Collection of Northern Zone Bronzes in the Penn Museum [39]

 PENG Peng: Rediscovering Bronze Art and Technology of Early China from the Mayer Collection [40]

QU Lian: Filial Piety vs. Perfect Charity: A Case on the Pictorial Depictions of the Vessantara Jataka in the Northern Dynasties [41]

 

 

Afternoon

13:00-SEAA COUNCIL MEETING

(CGIS S0250 - 2nd Floor Meeting Room)

 

VIII (X) Chinese Skywatch: Art, Astronomy and Beyond

Organizer: Eugene Y. WANG

Archaeoastronomy has emerged as one of the key and robust developments in twenty-first century archaeological thinking. Much as Mesoamerica lays legitimate claim to being the intellectual heartland of this branch of archeology, China deserves a fair share of the claim. Many recent archaeological discoveries in China have supplied new evidence as well as impetus for the new disciplinary, or rather, interdisciplinary, formation of archaeoastronomy as an interface between art history, archaeology, astronomy, and other related fields. New concerns and methodological tool boxes may propel a paradigm shift away from mere “alignment studies” of the sky to more nuanced concerns with perception and cognition. The cultural-interpretative re-orientation that gives archaeoastronomy an edge may also lead to the re-focus of the study of the Chinese sky beyond mere affirmation of astronomical knowledge to more expansive cosmologies. It may yield new insight into cases and bodies of materials both old and new.

David PANKENIER: Interpreting Celestial Simulacra [42]

XU Fengxian: A Conjecture on the Astronomical Use of yazhang 牙璋 [43]

Eugene Y. WANG: Where and How to Locate the Heaven in Tombs? The Case of Mawangdui [44]

 Nancy STEINHARDT: Tombs of the Stars: the Role of Goguryeo in the Dome of Heaven Phenomenon [45]

 HE Nu: The Gnomon Shadow Template from Taosi [46]

 

IX General Session: Dynastic China

Chair: Chao-Hui Jenny LIU

GUO Yanlong: The Cost of Bronze Mirrors in the Han Empire (202 BCE-220 CE) [48]

Chao-Hui Jenny LIU: GIS Research on the “Mountainʺ Satellite Tombs of Tang Taizong's (598-649 CE) Zhaoling 昭陵 [49]

Magdalena ALTYN: Walled Sites along the Han River as a Material Representation Reflecting Struggle for Power in the Three Kingdoms Period [50]

CHEN Hao: A Brief Study on the Plan Layout of the Imperial Ancestral Temple of the Southern Song Dynasty [51]

HSU Yiu-kang, Benjamin SABATINI: Thermodynamic Insight into the Production, Circulation, and Recycling of Ancient Chinese Coinage [52]

 

X  Bioarchaeology: Reconstruction of the Past from Ancient Excavated Bones

Organizer: FUJITA Hisashi / M. ERDENE / Shiori FUJISAWA

A great deal of information is hidden in the bones excavated from the archaeological sites. Therefore, analyzing these bones from a bioarchaeological point of view can contribute greatly to the "socio-biological reconstruction" of the people who lived in the site. In this session, we will verify the meaning indicated by the results of the analysis of the traces of bone disease, killing and dismantling that the animal bones have retained, using the materials of both human and animal bones that were excavated in Mongolia and Japan. At the same time, through the production of stone tools as one of the physical activities of the people of that time, we will seek to "reconstruct" the mode of past human activities by using experimental techniques. From one word of "bones", we will discuss many things and will try to reveal the usefulness in the field of bioarchaeology.

Yumiko OYABU: Paleopathological Analysis of Wounds on Human Skeletal Remains of the Yayoi Period in Japan [53]

UETSUKI Manabu: Samurai Horses Revealed through Zooarchaeological Analysis [54]

Kenji NAGAI: Variabilities of East Asian Pressure Flaking Techniques on Bifaces during the Final Upper Paleolithic and Early Neolithic: Understanding the Knapper’s Kinesiological Differences as an Indicator of Culturally Learned Behavior [55]

 Myagmar ERDENE, Shiori FUJISAWA: Reconstruction of Everyday Lifestyle of Medieval Mongolians through the Analysis of Clavicle Paleopathologies [56]

 Shiori FUJISAWA: Joint Disease found on Human Skeletal Remains Excavated from Early-Modern Japanese Archaeological Sites [57]

FUJITA Hisashi: Cranial and Dental Stress Markers on the Human Skeletal Remains from Ancient Egypt QAU Site [58]

 

XI General Session: From Early Settlements to Cities

Chair: XIE Liye

Susanne REICHERT: Urban Craftsmanship: Karakorum [59]

CHEN Xiao: Practice and Model: City Form and Urban Planning in Early China [60]

XIE Liye: Urban Construction as a Social Transformation Process during the Longshan and Erlitou Periods in the Middle Yellow River Valley [61]

WANG Minghui: A Study of the Health Status of Ancient People in the Central Plains¬—Focused on the Jiahu Site and Xipo Cemetery [62]

LIU Yu: A Study of the Smelting and Casting Technology of Copper and Copper Alloy Wares from the Central Plains in the Early Bronze Age of China [63]

 

XII New Advances in Understanding the Prehistory of the Tibetan Plateau, Part I: Environmental Preconditions and Subsistence Practices

Organizers: Jade d’ALPOIM GUEDES / Anke HEIN / LU Hongliang

The “Roof of the World” has long presented a set of unique and challenging high altitude ecological conditions to which early hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists and pastoralists had to adapt. A recent increase in archaeological fieldwork on the Tibetan Plateau, combined with new methodological and theoretical frameworks has lead to re-appraisals of previous assumptions about early life on the Plateau. Papers in this session will highlight new research that focuses on understanding how humans developed adaptations for hypoxia, how foragers exploited resources in high altitude biomes, how humans moved crops, and adapted existing and invented new pastoral systems.

LU Hongliang: The Multi-resource Economy of early Tibet: The Evidence from Bangga Site, Central Tibet [64]

JIN Hetian: Early Subsistence Practices at Prehistoric Dadunzi in Yuanmou, Yunnan: New Evidence for the Origins of Early Agriculture in Southwest China [65]

Jade d’ALPOIM GUEDES: Documenting a Rapid Transition in Agricultural Regimes on the Tibetan Plateau [66]

 Catrin KOST: The Role of Monuments in Shaping Mobile-Pastoralist Landscapes in Bronze Age Northwest China [67]

 David RHODE: Late Paleolithic to Neolithic Transition in the Northeast Tibetan Plateau: Recent Findings [68]

ZHU Ping: A Comparative Study on Tibetan Pottery: A Cultural Ecological Perspective [69]

BREAK

ZHANG Dongju, DONG Guanghui, WANG Qianqian, REN Xiaoyan, CHEN Fahu: Human Migration to the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau: A Preliminary Study of 151 Site in the Qinghai Lake Basin [70]

MA Minmin: Isotopic Evidence of Dietary Shift in Northwestern China [71]

Chris STEVENS: Tracking the Domestication and Spread of Broomcorn and Foxtail Millet within China [72]

 

XIII  Weapons, people and societies in pre-Han China

Organizers: CAO Qin / LI Xiuzhen / XU Jian / ZHAO Congcang / GUO Yanli

Weapons have traditionally been perceived as implements associated with warfare and violence. However, the variety and quality of weapons recovered from archaeological excavations, coupled with existing textual evidence seems to suggest that their functions and roles in society are more complex and multi-faceted. Despite this potential, weapons have rarely been employed as evidence in major works of early Chinese archaeology and history. In this session, we will explore the multivocality of weapons in pre-Han China (prior to 206 BC). What can weapons, and their relationships with other material remains, tell us about the societies where they existed and the people who engaged with them? How can we investigate weapons, beyond typological and chemical analyses?

ZHAO Congcang: The Features and Historic Significance of the Bronze Arms Excavated in Cheng Yang Region of Southern Shaanxi Province [74]

GUO Yanli: Funerals and Sacrifices: Dynasties and their Neighbours as seen through Chinese Bronze Weapons [75]

CAO Qin: Too Fragile to Fight? High-lead Weapons during the Late Shang, China (c. 1200- 1050 B.C.) [76]

 LI Xiuzhen: Functional Bronze Weapons for the Qin First Emperor's Afterlife [77]

 XU Jian: Defining Bronze Weapons from Southwest China: A Contextual Study [78]

 

XIV General Session: The Practice and History of Archaeology

Chair: ZHANG Wenjie

Clayton BROWN: The American School of Archaeology in China, 1912-1934 [79]

Gary GUAN: Challenges and Approaches in English Renditions of Chinese Archaeological Materials [80]

Simon KANER, Gary CRAWFORD, Gyoung-ah LEE: Writing the Archaeology of Korea and Japan [81]

FU Yue: Archaeological Study of ʺCultural normsʺ from Shang to Western Zhou Dynasties [82]

ZHANG Wenjie: The Suspended-Bell System and the Display of Bells in Zhou Tombs [83]

 

SEAA MEMBERSHIP MEETING

(Harvard Art Museums)

 

One Minute Poster Summaries:

• Friday AM

o Elizabeth LaDUC: Technical Study of Ceramics from the Qijia Culture [A-1]

o Francesca BEWER: Seated Attendant Bodhisattva from Dun Huang [A-2]

o Zoe EDDY: Mixed Mediation and Mobile Exhibits [A-3]

o ZORN: Hands-on Station for the New China Gallery [A-4]

o Jada KO: Archaeologists as Filmmakers: Archaeology and Local Communities (FILM) [A-5]

o OKADERA Miki, Simon KANER: The Sacred Island of Okinoshima and its Contribution to the Archaeology of Religion (FILM) [A-6]

o ZHAI Shaodong: Replication Experiments on the Lithic Products from the Huadizui Site, China [A-7]

 

• Saturday AM

o KIKUCHI Seiichi: Archaeological Survey in Hoian, Vietnam [B-1]

o CHEN Jian, ZHOU Zhiqing, HE Kunyu: Preliminary Studies on the Interaction of Cultural and Environmental Changes: An Example from the Highlands of Western Sichuan and the Chengdu Plain [B-2]

o XIE Tao: New Discoveries at Laoguanshan [B-3]

o NAGATOMO Tomoko, NAKAMURA Daisuke, KIM Gyu-Ho: Comparative Study of Pottery Production on the Japanese Archipelago and Korean Peninsula during the Early Period of Kiln Use [B-4]

o Takafumi NIWA, Mamoru HIROKAWA, Hidehiro SHINGO, Yosuke HIGUCHI, Takahiro YATSUKI: Contrastive Experimental Study for Reconstructing Manufacturing Technology of Chinese Bronze Artifacts [B-5]

 

• Saturday PM

o LU Houyuan: Earliest Tea as Evidence for One Branch of the Silk Road across the Tibetan Plateau [C-1]

o WU Naiqin: Mid-Neolithic Exploitation of Mollusks in the Guanzhong Basin of Northwestern China: Preliminary Results [C-2]

o CHEN Shuqing: An Analysis of the Danangou Graveyard--Based on ACCESS Data Mining [C-3]

o NING: The question of Yu Yi Ren 余一人 on Oracle Inscriptions: Studies of the People-oriented Thoughts and Royal Power [C-4]

o LI Xiaoqing: Early Wheat Agriculture, Bronze Smelting, and Pictographs in the Hexi Corridor, Northwest China [C-5]

 

• Sunday AM

o WANG Changsui, LI Wenjing, CHEN Yue: The Redefinition of Celadon and the New Idea of its Origin [D-1]

o Rory WALSH: Ceramic Production and Social Politics in Mahan and Baekje: Preliminary Results from INAA [D-2]

o Hyunsoo LEE: Comparative Perspective across the Early Holocene Northeast China and Korea: Archaeobotanical Study on Houtaomuga site, Jilin Province [D-3]

o Camilla Kelsoe STURM: Economic Networks in Neolithic Walled Towns: A pXRF Analysis of Utilitarian Pottery from the Jianghan Plain [D-4]

o Elaine W. Y. CHENG: Cross Dynastic Production: Bronze Vessel Production between Shang and Zhou dynasties [D-5]

o Emma YASUI: Seeing the (Previously) Unseen: Starch Grain Analysis on Jomon Period Ground Stone from Hokkaido, Japan [D-6]

o Hari BLACKMORE: Crafting and Social Distinction in Central Korea: Daeseong-ri and beyond [D-7]

o Rachel LEE: Changes in the Organization of Craft Production in Mumun Period Southern South Korea [D-8]

 

• Sunday PM

o Jina HEO: Socioeconomic Complexity and Landscape Change in Iron Age of Korea: Contrasting Household in Southwestern and Central Korea [E-1]

o LEE Jinok: Landscape Evolution and Land-use Strategies in the Lower Yellow River Valley, 8000-2000 BP [E-2]

o Mitchell MA: Enhancing the Interpretative Value of Flotation Sampling: Preliminary Results from Yangguanzhai, Shaanxi Province, People's Republic of China [E-3]

o Pauline SEBILLAUD: Intra-site Analysis using Systematic Regional Survey Method: A Case-study on the Hanshu site [E-4]

o KWAK Seungki: Pottery Usage and Prehistoric Subsistence during the Middle Bronze Age, Central west part of the Korean Peninsula [E-5]

o Tricia OWLETT: Late Neolithic diets at Shimao and Zhaimaoliang, Ordos Region, China: Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of human and faunal remains [E-6]

 

Business Meeting

 

 


 

DAY 3: June 10, Friday (at Harvard University)

Morning

 

POSTER SESSION A (General Session)

 

• Elizabeth LaDUC: Technical Study of Ceramics from the Qijia Culture [A-1]

• Francesca BEWER: Seated Attendant Bodhisattva from Dun Huang [A-2]

• Zoe EDDY: Mixed Mediation and Mobile Exhibits [A-3]

• ZORN: Hands-on Station for the New China Gallery [A-4]

• Jada KO: Archaeologists as Filmmakers: Archaeology and Local Communities (FILM) [A-5]

• OKADERA Miki, Simon KANER: The Sacred Island of Okinoshima and its Contribution to the Archaeology of Religion (FILM) [A-6]

• ZHAI Shaodong: Replication Experiments on the Lithic Products from the Huadizui Site, China [A-7]

 

XV Moving Backward and Forward through Time—Cumulative Han Culture and the Study of Early China

Organizers: Yitzchak JAFFE / Glenda CHAO

In the field of Ancient China studies, scholars have often turned to the more recent past, and its many textual sources, to aid them in their efforts of illuminating the deeper past. What has allowed this ‘free movement through time’ is the notion that Chinese civilization is monolithic and unchanging; a cumulative culture that adds to its solid core. The issue of continuity vs. change is certainly not unique to Chinese scholarship and ways in which scholars choose to reconcile long term regional developments, historical projections and archaeological data in their studies varies widely. This panel will bring together historians and archaeologists to discuss these topics by reflecting on their own work on China’s past. Using multiple data sources is the only way forward as scholars must recognizes the limitation of projecting historical records into the past and that archaeology cannot solve everything.

Glenda CHAO: The Archaeology of Mortuary Ritual in the Southern Nanyang Basin: How Localized Research can Shed Light on Broader Questions of Cultural Transformations [85]

Armin SELBITSCHKA: Figuring It Out: The Origins of Tomb Figurines and Models in Received Literature and the Archaeological Record [86]

Francis ALLARD: Conceiving China’s Southern Border during the Han Dynasty: Perspectives from Archaeology and History [87]

 Roderick CAMPBELL: Sima Qian and the Invention of the Shang Dynasty [88]

 Michael PUETT: DISCUSSANT [89]

 

XVI General Session: Dynastic China

Chair: Allison MILLER

 ZHANG Changping: The First Emperor’s Unification of China: The Cultural Foundation as Materially Manifested in the Yangzi Region [90]

 Allison MILLER: Jade Suits and Royal Power: Illuminating Artistic Production in the Regional Centers of the Western Han [91]

 Keith KNAPP: Sanitizing Filiality: The Changing Iconography and Pantheon of Filial Piety Tales in Pre-modern China [92]

 Gwen BENNETT: Using New Perspectives and Methods to Study the Medieval Period Liao Empire [93]

Callan ROSS-SHEPARD: Khitan/Liao Utilitarian Ceramic Exchange Networks within the Chifeng Region, Inner Mongolia [94]

 

XVII New Developments in Maritime Archaeology and Maritime History of China

Organizer: JIANG Bo, Chair: WU Chunming

Recent years have witnessed important developments in Chinese underwater archaeology,particularly with discoveries of shipwrecks such as the Nanhai I, Nanao I, and Xiao Baijiao I, among others. Underwater archaeological findings represent the history of Maritime Silk Route from/to China. At the same time, the technology, method and theory of underwater archaeology in China have also experienced great changes during the last decade.

XU Wenpeng: Regional Variation? Exploring the Differentiation of Maritime Ceramic Trade among Southeast Asian Polities in the 12-13th Century [95]

LIU Miao: The Discovery of Spanish Colonial Coins of the 16-18th century Along the Southeast Coast of China [96]

WU Chunming: An Ethno-archaeological Exploration to the Origin of Maritime Han Ethnic Group in the Coastal region of Southern China [97]

 Libby CHAN: Newly Excavated Shipwrecks in China and Southeast Asia: Revisiting Medieval Chinese Maritime Trade [98]

 DING Yu: A Brief Discussion on Chinese Ceramics Excavated from Malindi Sites in Kenya and the Communication Between China and East Africa from the 9th to 15th Century [99]

David V. HILL, Philippe SCIAU, ZHU Tiequan: A Comparative Study of Three Yuan Dynasty Qinghua Chargers [100]

 

XIX New Advances in Understanding the Prehistory of the Tibetan Plateau, Part II: Cultural Contacts and Human Movement

Organizers: Jade d’ALPOIM GUEDES / Anke HEIN / LU Hongliang

The “Roof of the World” has long presented a set of unique and challenging high altitude ecological conditions to which early hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists and pastoralists had to adapt. A recent increase in archaeological fieldwork on the Tibetan Plateau, combined with new methodological and theoretical frameworks has lead to re-appraisals of previous assumptions about early life on the Plateau. Papers in this session will highlight new research that focuses on understanding how humans developed adaptations for hypoxia, how foragers exploited resources in high altitude biomes, how humans moved crops, and adapted existing and invented new pastoral systems.

Mark ALDENDERFER: Evidence for Lithic-Period Settlement Patterns in Far Western Tibet [105]

Christina WARINNER, Choongwon JEONG, Andrew T. OZGA, David WITONSKY, Helena MALMSTRÖM, Hanna EDLUND, Courtney A. HOFMAN, Richard HAGAN, Mattias JAKOBSSON, Cecil M. LEWIS, Jr., Mark ALDENDERFER, Anna DI RIENZO: Long-term Genetic Stability and a High-altitude East Asian Origin for the Peoples of the High Valley of the Himalayan Arc [106]

Guanghui DONG, Lele REN, Xin JIA, Guoqiang LI, Haiming LI, Fahu CHEN: How did Humans Permanently Settle on the Highlands of the Qaidam Basin, Northern Tibetan Plateau during Bronze Age? [107]

 LI Yongxian: The Early Rock Art in the Indus River Valley in Eastern Tibet [108]

 Vinod NAUTIYAL: The Emergence of Pre-Buddhist Burial Practices, Pyrotechnology, and Trade in Indian Trans-Himalaya: Fresh Archaeological Evidence from Kinnaur, Himachal Pradesh, and Uttarakhand, India [109]

 

 REN Xiaoyan: Pompeii of the East: The Prehistoric Disaster Site of Lajia [110]

 Rita DAL MARTELLO: Archaeobotanical Results from the Baiyangcun Site, Yunnan: Exploring Agricultural Pathways in Southwest China [111]

 Ellen PLATTS: The Use of Surface and Hydrology Models for Prehistoric Rice Cultivation in Highland Environments [112]

 Alice YAO: Thinking about Food Security in Prehistoric South China [113]

 

XX  New Perspectives in Korean Archaeology: Theory, Method and Practice

Organizers: KO Ilhong / CHO Daeyoun

Archaeology in Korea has witnessed an explosion in the amount of material excavated since the turn of the millennium, with the number of annual excavations having increased exponentially in the last decade. As a result, a wide range of analytical and interpretative approaches have been adopted in order to come to terms with the newly accumulated archaeological data. Presented in this session are studies that well represent the new research perspectives currently being utilized by archaeologists in Korea. The papers feature alternative interpretations of widely discussed issues, demonstrate attempts to broaden the range of methodological approaches used, and explore previously overlooked data sets.

KO Ilhong, Daeyoun CHO: Reassessing the Garakdong Culture of the Korean Bronze Age through an Examination of the North Korean Archaeological Material [115]

YI Kisung: Changes in the Stone Tool Production System of the Korean Peninsula: Bronze Age Chipped Stone Tools [116]

KIM Jongil: Craftsmanship in the Korean Bronze Age - Focusing on the Concept of ‘Techne’ and Bronze Casting [117]

 BAE Jinsung: Social Stratification in the Bronze Age of the Korean Peninsula [118]

 CHO Daeyoun, SIN Mincheol, PARK Seohyeon, NA Injeong: Exploring Social Stratification in the Hoseo Region from the Proto-Three Kingdoms to Three Kingdoms Period – An Examination through Settlement Analysis [119]

 

 LEE Namkyu, KIM Kwonil: Experimental Archaeology on the Smelting of Iron in Ancient Korea [120]

 SHIN Kyunghwan, CHOI Youngmin: Metallurgical Analysis and Review of the Results of Experimental Work on the Iron Smelting Furnace of Ancient Korea [121]

 KIM Nakjung, KIM Chorong: The Keyhole-shaped Tombs of the Korean Peninsula – A Consideration on Tombs, Nationalism, and the Overlooked Role of Local Society [122]

 Peter Garth ARMSTRONG: Deconstructing the Reconstructions of the Silla Capital [123]

Roland FLETCHER, Peter Garth ARMSTRONG: Reviewing the Excavation at Moryangri and the Silla Capital [124]

 

Afternoon

 

LUNCH & MID-CONFERENCE EXCURSION

(Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

WOMEN IN ASIAN ARCHAEOLOGY MEETING

 

 


 

DAY 4: June 11, Saturday (at Boston University)

 

Morning

 

POSTER SESSION B (General Session)

 

 

• KIKUCHI Seiichi: Archaeological Survey in Hoian, Vietnam [B-1]

• CHEN Jian, ZHOU Zhiqing, HE Kunyu: Preliminary Studies on the Interaction of Cultural and Environmental Changes: An Example from the Highlands of Western Sichuan and the Chengdu Plain [B-2]

• XIE Tao: New Discoveries at Laoguanshan [B-3]

• NAGATOMO Tomoko, NAKAMURA Daisuke, KIM Gyu-Ho: Comparative Study of Pottery Production on the Japanese Archipelago and Korean Peninsula During the Early Period of Kiln Use [B-4]

• Takafumi NIWA, Mamoru HIROKAWA, Hidehiro SHINGO, Yosuke HIGUCHI, Takahiro YATSUKI: Contrastive Experimental Study for Reconstructing Manufacturing Technology of Chinese Bronze Artifacts [B-5]

 

 

XXI Plant Domestication and Environmental Change in Neolithic China

Organizers: YANG Xiaoyan / ZHANG Jianping / Brian LANDER

In recent years, the origins and dispersals of agriculture and the potential role of climate and environment change in those processes have been intensively studied. Although some doubts remain, there is strong evidence suggesting that climate fluctuations, such as drought and cold spells, could be closely associated with ancient human adaptation and plant subsistence strategies around the world. This session employs well-dated, high-resolution environment and climate records, alongside research in archaeology, archaeobotany, quaternary sciences, and palaeontology to throw light on when, where, why, and which species were first used and later domesticated in East Asia. It also studies the routes of their dispersals. This panel will clarify the relations between ancient environmental changes and agriculture origins across East Asia, and provide suggestions on what research is needed in the future.

WU Yan: Investigation of the Origin of Rice Agriculture in the Lower Yangze River Area based on the Phytolith Record [125]

MA Zhikun, YANG Xiaoyan: Early Millet Use in the West Liaohe Area during the Early–Middle Holocene [126]

MA Yongchao, YANG Xiaoyan: Implications of Rice Bulliform Phytoliths to Rice Domestication in the Neolithic Lower Yangtze River Region [127]

 Alison WEISSKOPF: Alternative Approaches to early Rice in Asia: Wetland Emitters versus Rainfed Dispersers [128]

 Brian LANDER: The Ecology of Subsistence in the Neolithic Guanzhong Basin [129]

ZHANG Jianping: Phytolith Analysis for the Discrimination of Millets and Related Wild Grasses [130]

 ZHANG Junna: Vegetation Change during 9200-7000 cal yr BP. and its Influence on the Transition from Hunting-gathering Period to Neolithic in the Central plains of China [131]

 LIU Jiangtao, JIN Guiyun: Study on Archaeological Rice of the Haidai Region, East China [132]

 XU Deke: 500-year Climate Cycles Stacking of recent Centennial Warming and its possible Linkage to the Rise and Fall of Chinese Dynasties [133]

 Loukas BARTON, Isaac ULLAH: Computer Simulation and the Origins of Agriculture in East Asia [134]

 

XXII The Archaeology of Bodily Adornment across Asia

Organizers: Sheri LULLO / Leslie WALLACE

Personal adornment articulates the body, rendering it socially and culturally meaningful. Headdresses and hats, hairstyles, jewelry and other ornaments, while relatively small embellishments to an individual, nevertheless serve as assertive identifiers, communicating membership, mitigating difference, and enabling interaction. This session brings together papers that focus on bodily adornments as observed in archaeological contexts across Asia, highlighting multiple ways that adornment has functioned to define and gather social and (multi)cultural identities. Papers approach adornment as an embodied practice whereby the embellished body is understood by its existence in and engagement with both immediate and affiliated cultures. Case studies from Central Asia, China, Korea and Japan explore the significance of adornment from both palace-temple and mortuary sites, key arenas for challenging or reinforcing social values and norms.

Karen RUBINSON: Why Wear Dolphins? Greek Imagery among the Pastoralists along the ancient Oxus [135]

Leslie WALLACE: Does a Feather in Your Hat a Barbarian Make? So-called non-Han Headgear and Hairstyles in Han Dynasty Tomb Murals in the Ordos [136]

Sheri LULLO: Ornamenting the Chignon: Women's Hair and Hairstyles in Han China [137]

 Sarah LAURSEN: Dressing the Dead in Jin China [138]

 Sarah NELSON: Personal Adornment in Early Korea [139]

 

 Illona BAUSCH: Early Beadstone Body Ornaments in East Asia and their Antecedents 1: Jomon-Yayoi [140]

 Gina BARNES, Ari TANIZAWA: Early Beadstone Body Ornaments in East Asia and their Antecedents 2: Kofun-Nara [141]

 Karen GERHART, Katheryn LINDUFF: Ornamentation that Enhanced the Standing of Human and Equine haniwa [142]

 

XXIII Foreign Influence on the State Formation Processes in Early Japan

Organizers: Ken’ichi SASAKI / Shin’ya FUKUNAGA

State formation in Japan is undoubtedly a good case of secondary state. In recent years, numerous archaeological discoveries have been reported, suggesting various different aspects of Japan’s adoption of cultures of Chinese and Korean origins. In this session, we present evidence of settlements, iron weapons and armor, ceramics, bronze mirrors, horses, and kinship system in order to discuss how these foreign cultures influenced on the state formation processes in Japan.

Shin’ya FUKUNAGA: The Role of Foreign Prestige Goods in the Formation of the Yamato Government [144]

Gen MIYOSHI: External Influence and Uniqueness in Dwellings and Settlement Structure [145]

Takehiko MATSUGI: Warrior Ideology and Political Authority in Kofun Period Japan [146]

 Tatsuo NAKAKUBO: Social Change and the Introduction of Continental Craft Technology [147]

 Joseph RYAN: External Influence and Internal Development in the Evolution of Iron Weapons within the Japanese Archipelago [148]

 

 Ken’ichi SASAKI: Adoption of a Practice of Horse-riding in Fifth century Japan [149]

 Akira SEIKE: Political Situations in the Korean Peninsula and the Evolution of Kinship System during Kofun Period Japan [150]

 Takafumi YAMAMOTO: Burials of Emigrants: The Spread of Burial Customs as seen from Stone-Chamber Tombs in Korea, Japan and China [151]

 Britta STEIN: Granulation and the Tree of Life: How Goldsmithing Techniques and Religious Beliefs Connect the Far East with the West [152]

 

XXIX Nationalism and Ethnic Identities in East Asian Archaeology

Organizers: KANG In Uk / PAK Yangjin

A history-oriented interpretation of archaeological data is one of the distinctive features of East Asian archaeology of the 20th century. In recent years, however, nationalistic interpretations have emerged as a new trend in addition to the historical approaches. This may indicate that archaeological practice and interpretation have been strongly affected not only by the political, social, and economic environments of each country but also by the recent surge of nationalistic sentiments and conservative political and social trends in the region. This session will try to examine the most recent developments and the role of nationalism in the archaeological research of ethnic identification on the basis of archaeological evidence. The presented papers will include analyses of the Korean Bronze Age and ancient Korean history, in particular of Gojoseon (Old Joseon), as well as the interpretation of archaeological data from much broader areas of northeast China, Mongolia, and Maritime Russia.

PAK Yangjin: Nationalist Agenda in North Korean Archaeology [153]

KANG In Uk: Faces of Old Joseun or Eastern Barbarian (Dongyi): Ethnic Identities of Bronze Mask Figures of the 1st Century BCE from Northeast China [154]

PARK Sun Mi: Power and Ideology in the Primary Societies of Northeast Asia [155]

 JO So Eun: Rituals and Ethnic Identity of Pazyryk Culture in Russian Altai [156]

 HAN Jin-seong: Belt Plaques of the Xiongnu Period as an Ethnic Indicator [157]

 

 AHN Jae Pil, KIM Tae Kyung: The Hongshan Shrine and the Dangun Mausoleum: Distorted Images of Archaeology in Northeast Asia [158]

 CHO In Sung: Government-designated Korean History Textbook and Old Joseon Archaeology in Korea [159]

 LEE Jeong-Bin, LEE, Kyung-Sup: Ethnic Nationalism of Old Joseon Archaeology in North Korea [160]

 KIM Sun-Woo: The Origination and Succession of Cultural Identities in the Korean Bronze Age [161]

 

Publishing in Asian Archaeology

 

 

Afternoon

 

POSTER SESSION C (General Session)

 

 

• LU Houyuan: Earliest Tea as Evidence for One Branch of the Silk Road across the Tibetan Plateau [C-1]

• WU Naiqin: Mid-Neolithic Exploitation of Mollusks in the Guanzhong Basin of Northwestern China: Preliminary Results [C-2]

• CHEN Shuqing: An Analysis of Da’nangou Graveyard--Based on ACCESS Data Mining [C-3]

• NING Zhenjiang: The question of Yu Yi Ren 余一人 on Oracle Inscriptions: Studies of the People-oriented Thoughts and Royal Power [C-4]

• LI Xiaoqiang: Early Wheat Agriculture, Bronze Smelting, and Pictographs in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China [C-5]

 

XXX From the Tian Shan to the Altai: Recent Advances in Archaeological Research

Organizer: Annie CHAN

The mountain ranges of Tian Shan and the Altai traverse an area that is attracting significant attention from the international archaeological community in recent decades but is lacking in commensurate academic discussions due to political, disciplinary and language barriers. Excavations and large-scale surveys at this important crossroad have yielded material evidence attesting to mechanisms of east-west transmissions in antiquity, behooving archaeologists to review the sociocultural makeup of ancient Eastern Central Asia from cross-regional perspectives. By uniting researchers conducting primary archaeological research in the region, this panel aims to forge a collective discourse on the research status quo and the direction of the field in an area transected nowadays by multiple political borders.

Jean BOURGEOIS, Wouter GHEYLE, Gertjan PLETS: Landscape Archaeological Research in the Altai Mountains (Republic of Altai, Russian Federation), An Overview of the Results [162]

Alexey TISHKIN: New Discovery of «Deer» Stones in the Territory of the Mongolian Altai [163]

Alexey KOVALEV: Ritual Complex of Chemurchek (Qiemuerqieke) Culture Khar Chuluut in the Highlands of Mongolian Altai [164]

 Nikolai SEREGIN: Results of Archaeological Research of Turkic Ritual Sites in the Mongolian Altai [165]

 Gino CASPARI: Landscape Archaeology in the Foothills of the Chinese Altai [166]

Annie CHAN: A Geospatial Analysis of Bronze Age Stoneworks in the Asian Steppes [167]

BREAK

CONG Dexin: Tian Shan as Bridge: Adunqiaolu from the Perspective of the Eurasian Steppes [168]

ZHANG Liangren: Prehistoric Archaeology of Eastern Xinjiang [169]

Mauricio HERNANDEZ: A VERY Sick Tomb: A Case Study of Infectious and Metabolic Disease at Yanghai, Turfan Basin, Xinjiang [170]

Kazuo MIYAMOTO: Social Change of Herding Society Viewed from the Stone-Slab Graves in Mongolia [171]

Rebecca O’SULLIVAN: Inter-regional Interaction and the Landscape Perspective: Rock-art in the Altai, 2nd-1st Millennium BCE [172]

 

XXXI Historical Archaeology of East and Southeast Asia

Organizers: Kaoru UEDA / Ellen HSIEH / Jeff CHENG

Historical archaeology has developed, reflecting individual archaeological traditions and historical backgrounds in various parts of the world. Archaeologists working in East and Southeast Asia are increasingly conducting studies focusing on more recent time periods than their traditional coverage. Meanwhile, North American historical archaeology, originated from the investigations of post-Columbian history, has developed and expanded its coverage to include more thematic questions and contributed to theoretical discussion in the field. This panel aims to bring together examples of historical archaeology conducted in East and Southeast Asia to regional and international audience.

Jeff Chieh-fu CHENG, Chin-yung CHAO, Yayoi MITSUDA: Outpost or Household? The Historical Archaeology of Japanese Police Stations in the Mountains of Central-south Taiwan during 1920 to 1945 [173]

Ellen HSIEH: Spanish Colonialism in Asia: A Multiscalar Perspective [174]

Takashi SAKAI: Ceramics Found in the Trowulan Site, Indonesia [175]

 Kaoru UEDA: A Comparative Study of Cross-cultural Interactions: Different Trajectories within the Dutch East India Company [176]

 WENG Yu-wen: Islamic Influence on Chinese Kilns – Take the Export Ceramics to Southeast Asia for example [177]

Sharon WONG WAIYEE: A Comparative Study between a Khmer Ceramic Production Site and Chinese Ceramic Consumption Site in Angkor, Cambodia [178]

BREAK

Miyuki YAMAGUCHI: The Archaeology and Restoration Project of the Dutch East India Company’s Trading Post at Dejima, Japan [179]

Marnie FENELEY: Reconstructing God - Sculpture and Power - (The West Mebon Viṣṇu in its Art Historical, Hydrological and Political Context) [180]

OKADERA Miki, Simon KANER: The Sacred Island of Okinoshima and its Contribution to the Archaeology of Religion [181]

John MIKSIC: DISCUSSANT [182]

 

XXXII Food and Society in Prehistoric East Asia: New Frontiers of Transdisciplinary Approaches towards Ancient Culinary Culture

Organizers: Leo Aoi HOSOYA / Shin’inchi NAKAMURA

Recent introduction of systematic archaeobiology and chemical analyses into East Asian archaeology has provided remarkably new insights to ancient foodways and its relationships with social organization: its regional diversities and chronological shifts. Based on the recent research achievements particularly in China, JSPS-supported 5-year project “Rice Cultivation and Chinese Civilization” was launched in July 2015. In this project, highly transdisciplinary research, from advanced chemical analyses to rethinking of conventional artefact studies, is conducted to investigate the real significance of rice production/consumption as the basis of Chinese and East Asian civilization using various substantial data. In this session, to kick-off the project, its representative members discuss potentialities of developing a new scope to ancient subsistence-related activities to provide further new insights to discussion on East Asian prehistoric society, using diverse methods: artifact studies, ethnoarchaeology, macro/micro botanical remains, pottery use-wear and imprints analyses, DNA analyses, paleopathological analyses and carbon/nitrogen isotope analyses.

Leo Aoi HOSOYA: Processing, Storage and Symbolism of Wild Nuts in the Past and Present: Comparative Ethnoarchaeobotanical Studies of East Asia and USA [183]

OBATA Hiroki: What Seed and Insect Impression / Cavities on Potteries Tell? [184]

KOBAYASHI Masashi: Cooking Pottery Use-wear Analyses to Reconstruct Rice Cooking Methods of Early Rice Farmers in Japan and Middle China [185]

 KAMIJO Nobuhiko: Research on Macrobotanical Remains of the Horse Chestnuts and Manchurian Walnuts from a Waterlogged Site of the Latter Half of Jomon Period, North-Eastern Japan [186]

 TANAKA Katsunori: Shifting of Seed Morphology and DNA Variation in Japanese Rice [187]

OKAZAKI Kenji, H. TAKAMOKI, M. YONEDA, H. KIKUCHI, S., YONEMOTO, T. TOMITA, T. NAKAHASHI, J. CHEN, J. SONG: Paleopathological Approach on the Neolithic Human Skeletal Remains Unearthed from the Guangfulin Site in the Shanghai City, China [188]

BREAK

SHIBUTANI Ayako, SUN Guoping, CHEN Jie, SONG Jian: Eating Rice or Acorns? Starch Evidence of Neolithic Human Dental Calculus in the Lower Yangtze Region, China [189]

YONEDA Minoru, KIKUICHI Hiroki, MARUYAMA Masashi, SUN Guoping: Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Analyses on the Neolithic Human, Animal and Plant Remains from the Tianluoshan Site, Zhejiang Province, China [190]

Sheahan BESTEL, HUA Zhong, BAO Yingjian: Nuts, Millet and Rice: Plant Remains from the Zhuzhai Village Site, Henan, China During the Middle Peiligang Period 7,900 - 7,700 cal BP [191]

Tricia OWLETT: Food between the Country and the City: The Politics of Food Production in Early Cities and Hinterlands at Shimao and Zhaimaoliang, Neolithic Northern China [192]

 

XXXIII Connecting Technology, Economy, and Social Change in Prehistoric China

Organizers: Anke HEIN / Gideon SHELACH

In recent years, scholars in many disciplines have come to realize the importance of materials and artifacts as agents of social, economic, and technological change. Archaeology is par excellence the discipline that links materiality and social change; therefore, archaeology should be leading this exiting intellectual trend. Participants in our panel are using archaeological data from prehistoric China to examine how materials remains not only reflect social and cultural change but are themselves integral parts and active forces of those same changes. Through the examination of a diverse group of case studies from various parts of China ranging from the late Paleolithic to the early historic period we highlight patterns that are relevant to our understanding of Chinese history and culture. At the same time, we hope to further our understanding of human behavior in general and the interaction between people and the material world in particular.

Anne UNDERHILL: New Methodological Directions for Analysis of Chinese Ceramics: Suggestions for Future Research [194]

Richard EHRICH: Ceramic production techniques along the Middle Yangzi River around 3000 BC [195]

Ling-yu HUNG, CUI Jianfeng, LIN Shu-Feng, WANG Hui: Machang Pottery: Technological Innovation and Social Change in Late Neolithic NW China (ca. 4300–4000 BP) [196]

 Andrew WOMACK: Crafting Community: Initial Results from a Petrographic Analysis of Majiayao and Qijia Ceramics [197]

 Hsiu-Ping LEE: Active Selection by Local Elites: Contextualizing the Jue in the Erlitou and Lower Xiajiadian Cultures [198]

Roderick CAMPBELL: A View from Below: a Bone Artifact Assemblage from an Anyang Period Village and What it Suggests About the Shang Economy [199]

BREAK

Gideon SHELACH-LAVI: Anticipating Agriculture? Technological and Social Changes during the Pre-Neolithic Period in North China [200]

Li LIU, WANG Jiajing: The Origins and Development of Alcohol Production methods and Drinking Rituals in Ancient China [201]

LI Shuicheng: From Agriculture to Nomadism: Ganguya as a Case Study [202]

LIN Kuei-chen: Environmental decay and changes in production on the ancient Chengdu Plain [203]

Wengcheong LAM: The re-evaluation of iron industry and its regional variation in the Warring States period [204]

 

SATURDAY BOSTON UNIVERSITY RECEPTION

 

 


 

DAY 5: June 12, Sunday (at Boston University)

 

Morning

 

POSTER SESSION D: East Asian Landscapes: Diet and Craft in Prehistory and Early History

 

 

Organizers: Rory WALSH / Hyunsoo LEE

• WANG Changsui, LI Wenjing, CHEN Yue: The redefinition of celadon and the new idea of its origin [D-1]

• Rory WALSH: Ceramic production and social politics in Mahan and Baekje: preliminary results from INAA [D-2]

• Hyunsoo LEE: Comparative perspective across the Early Holocene Northeast China and Korea: Archaeobotanical study on Houtaomuga site, Jilin Province [D-3]

• Camilla Kelsoe STURM: Economic Networks in Neolithic Walled Towns: A pXRF Analysis of Utilitarian Pottery from the Jianghan Plain [D-4]

• Elaine W. Y. CHENG: Cross dynastic production: bronze vessel production between Shang and Zhou dynasties [D-5]

• Emma YASUI: Seeing the (Previously) Unseen: Starch Grain Analysis on Jomon Period Ground Stone from Hokkaido, Japan [D-6]

• Hari BLACKMORE: Crafting and Social Distinction in Central Korea: Daeseong-ri and beyond [D-7]

• Rachel LEE: Changes in the Organization of Craft Production in Mumun Period Southern South Korea [D-8]

 

XXXIV General Session: Mortuary Archaeology

Chair: Barbara SEYOCK

FAN Rong: Health and Nutritional Condition Changes during the Adoption of Agriculture: A case study on body size changes in the Beiqian Site, Shandong Province [205]

Deborah C. MERRETT, ZHANG Hua, XIAO Xiaoming, ZHANG Quanchao, WEI Dong, WANG Lixin, ZHU Hong, YANG Dongya: Inferences from Age of Stress Exposure: Exploring Lifeways in Bronze Age Northeast China [206]

Ilse TIMPERMAN: The Emergence of Niche Graves in the Turfan Basin [207]

 PARK Ah Rim: The Foreign Elements of Koguryo Tomb Murals with the Focus on the Nomadic and Central Asian Elements [208]

 Claire Yi YANG: Death Ritual in Tang-dynasty China (618-907): A Study of the Integration and Transformation of Elite Culture [209]

 

XXXV General Session: Chinese Metal Production

Chair: Matthew CHASTAIN

 LIU Yu: Study on the Smelting and Casting Technology of Copper and Copper Alloy Wares from Central Plains in the Early Bronze Age of China [210]

 SUZUKI Mai: The Production System of the Bronze Inscriptions in Shang Dynasty [211]

 Matthew CHASTAIN: Experimental replication of a specialized ceramic material used in bronze-casting molds from China’s Western Zhou period [212]

 YAMAMOTO Takashi: Rethinking Materiality of Chinese Bronze Vessels: History, Ideoeogy and Identity in Xichuan [213]

ZHOU Wenli: Crucible lead smelting in North China: evidence from modern documents and pre-modern remains [214]

 

XXXVI Reception and Re-interpretation of the material culture of the other: Case studies from China and Korea between the 2nd century BCE and the 10th century CE

Organizer: Shing MÜLLER

Archaeological studies on East Asia are frequently dedicated to the exchange of goods. Only a few researchers examine local responses to foreign stimuli: Many objects reveal their manufacture with local techniques, while they were modelled after a foreign example. Even more interesting are artefacts whose shapes and motifs were adapted to local tastes and usages. Incorporating foreign ideas, techniques and features into one’s own culture, and re-interpreting these in order to meet one’s needs, encouraged new cultural developments. Trades via the Silk Route and massive migrations of peoples between the 2nd century BCE and the 10th century CE enforced the encounter of cultures between East and West, North and South. As a result civilizations in China and Korea transformed frequently during this period. This panel shall explore the mechanism behind these changes, and thus the reception and re-interpretation on the basis of case studies from China and Korea.

Rebecca EHRENWIRTH: From Lacquer to Silver: The Transformation of the erbei 耳杯 cup in the Northern Dynasties [215]

Sonja FILIP: Taming beasts in Northern Wei tombs - The master/mistress of animals in Xianbei art [216]

Annette KIESER: Traces of “the other” in Six Dynasties (220-589) tomb findings Shing [217]

 MÜLLER: From couch to funerary couch and table in Early Medieval China [218]

 LIU Yan: Exotic Elements as Seen in Gold Ornaments of Han Elite Tombs [219]

Patricia FRICK: Pingtuo lacquer ware of the Tang dynasty and its foreign influences [219]

 

 Ariane PERRIN: Ancient glassware found in Silla burials in the Korean peninsula [220]

 Margarete PRÜCH: Imported or Made in Anhui?: Preliminary Ideas on the Origin of the Lacquer Objects from the Han Tombs at Chaohu, Anhui Province [221]

 James LANKTON, B. GRATUZE: Understanding Early Asian Potash Glass: New Insights from Chemical Analysis and Archaeology [222]

 LEE Nanhee: A Study on Goryeo Dynasty Incense Box with Angel Design in Mother-of-pearl Inlay [223]

 

 

XXXVII General Session: Landscape Archaeology, Nomadic Society and Central Asia

Chair: Jean Luc HOULE

Aline DREHER: Methods and Applications of Aerial Archaeology: A Comparison of Europe and Japan [224]

Daniel SHULTZ: Computer simulation of wealth inequality in pastoral nomadic society [225]

MATSUMOTO Keita: Seima-Turbino phenomenon and the 'exchanges' in the Eurasian Steppes [226]

 Jean Luc HOULE, Heather BYERLY: Climate and Causation? The Rise and Expansion of the Xiongnu Empire [227]

 DASHTEVEG Tumen: Bioarchaeology of the Xiongnu [228]

 

 Heather BYERLY, Cheryl MAKAREWICZ, Jean-Luc HOULE: Ritual and Mobility: 87Sr/86Sr, δ18O and δ13C analyses comparing modern and Bronze Age khirigsuur horses from Khanuy Valley, Mongolia [229]

 YUNDENBAT Boldbaatar: Prehistoric Pornography: Petroglyph Site at the “Grave of Thirty-Two” [230]

 Christina FRANKEN: Architecture of power in nomadic societies: Religious and profane architecture in the Mongolian Orkhon Valley—new results [231]

 KIM Jongil, KWAN Ohyoung, KIM Byeonjoon, HWAN Chulsoo, CHOI Woonho: Distribution and placement of Kurgan in Central Eurasia [232]

 

XXXVIII General Session: China - Neolithic to Bronze Age

Chair: WANG Yanxi

GUO Xiaoning: The Life Mode of Transitional Area between Farming and Animal Husbandry in North of China--Exemplified by the Excavated Remains in Muzhuzhuling and Shengedaling Sites [239]

WANG Yanxi: Reconstruction of Regional Polity under the Qujialing Expansion [240]

HE Xiaolin: Archaeological Discovery in Taijiasi Site in Funan, Anhui Province [241]

 SHENG Wei: Comparing analysis on two chronology researches of Yinxu culture [242]

 CHEN Beichen: Zeng state and its sustained interest in bells [243]

 

XXXIX Award Ceremony for Chinese Cultural Relics translation Contest

Organizer: Gary GUAN

 Presentations by Finalists
 Raffle Drawing
 

 

Afternoon

 

POSTER SESSION E: East Asian Landscapes: Diet and Craft in Prehistory and Early History

 

 

Organizers: Rory WALSH / Hyunsoo LEE

• Jina HEO: Socioeconomic Complexity and Landscape Change in Iron Age of Korea: Contrasting Household in Southwestern and Central Korea [E-1]

• LEE Jinok: Landscape evolution and land-use strategies in the lower Yellow River valley, 8000-2000 BP [E-2]

• Mitchell MA: Enhancing the Interpretative Value of Flotation Sampling: Preliminary Results from Yangguanzhai, Shaanxi Province, People's Republic of China [E-3]

• Pauline SEBILLAUD: Intra-site analysis using systematic regional survey method: Case-study on the Hanshu site [E-4]

• KWAK Seungki: Pottery usage and prehistoric subsistence during the Middle Bronze Age, Central west part of the Korean Peninsula [E-5]

• Tricia OWLETT: Late Neolithic diets at Shimao and Zhaimaoliang, Ordos Region, China: Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of human and faunal remains [E-6}

 

XL  Archaeological and Art Historical Studies of Historical Period China: Methods and Case Studies

Organizer: SUN Yan

Scholars who research the material culture of historical period China routinely encounter and engage with historical records such as inscriptions on bones, bronzes and bamboos, transmitted texts and memorial tomb stones to name a few. This panel intends to examine the interconnections between the studies of artifacts and material remains from archaeological contexts and historical records. Presenters will discuss current theoretical and practical problems that have grown out of their studies on the period and region where both material and inscriptional evidence are available. Case studies will use various lenses to critically examine the interface between the study of material culture and ancient historical documents and how textual and non-textual approaches to the past can be best integrated.

Huang Tsuimei: Complex Cultural Affinities as Observed in the Jade and Stone Ornaments from the Aristocrats’ Burials of the Yu State of Western Zhou [244]

MA Sai: Social changes in the Late Western Zhou period at Zhouyuan: From the perspective of archaeological remains and bronze inscriptions [245]

SUN Yan: Identity and Power of a Noblewoman in the Early Spring Autumn Period: A Case Study of Tomb M26 at Liangdaicun [246]

 WU Xiaolong: Balancing Archaeological and Textual Evidence in Eastern Zhou Archaeology [247]

 Mandy Jui-man WU: Loyalty or Betrayal: The Northern Zhou tomb of Wang Deheng (547-576 CE) [248]

 

CHUANG Huichih: The Difference Between Ideal and Reality: The Study of Celestial Images in Tomb Murals of the Tang Period [249]

LI Min, FANG Hui, ZHENG Tongxiu, Rachel LEE, and Henry WRIGHT: Archaeology of the Song Royal Ancestral Landscape [250]

LAM Hau-ling Eileen: From Mythology to Representation: Sheng and Its Iconography in Han Burial Ritual [251]

LYU Meng: The Manufacture and Utilization System of Roof Tile in Yecheng in the Northern Qi Dynasty, Focusing on the Roof Tiles Unearthed from the Hetaoyuan No.5 Architectural Site [252]

KIKUCHI Yuriko: Archaeological survey of hoards excavated in central Vietnam [253]

 

XLI New Technologies in Archaeological Research: Methodology, Application and Potential

Organizer: JIN Zhengyao / LI Sheng-Hua

This session focuses on new technological development in Archaeometry and Archaeochoronology, as well as their applications on various topics in Archaeological research in East Asia. The topics cover, but not limited to, the most recent development of new dating techniques (such as luminescence dating, radiocarbon, U-series, cosmogenic nuclides, etc.) and analytical methods (such as geochemical and isotopic analysis, etc.), and the applications of these new techniques to date archaeological sites and analyse fossils and artefacts from archaeological sites in South-East Asia. New techniques developed for fieldwork studies and other types of investigation will also be welcomed.

JIN Zhengyao: An Examination of Gear-shaped Bronzes of prehistoric China [255]

LI Sheng-Hua: Firing temperatures of pottery estimated by luminescence techniques [256]

YAN Lifeng: Elemental Distribution Profiles of Porcelain by Means of SEM-EDX [257]

 LI Bo: Luminescence dating of feldspars: a powerful tool for dating archaeological sites of the last 0.5 million years [258]

 FAN Anchuan: Luminescence Dating of Neolithic Hearths in the Loess Plateau: New Controls for the Dating of Stone-walled Settlements at Shimao, Shaanxi [259]

 

ZHANG Xinxiang, JIN Zhengyao, JIANG Zhilong, FAN Anchuan, LI Gong: Dietary differences associated with sex as determined by stable isotopes at the Bronze Age site of Jinlianshan, Yunnan Province, China [260]

ZHANGSUN Yingzi: Elemental and Lead Isotope Analyses of Han Mirrors from the Shaanxi History Museum Collection [261]

WEN Rui: West or East? The Provenance Study for the Glass Beads Excavated from the Shi-ren-zi-gou Series Sites Xinjiang China [262]

Cheryl MAKAREWICZ, Sarah PEDERZANI: Oxygen and carbon isotopic insights into Iron Age livestock mobility and funerary practices in the Xiongnu confederation [263]

Michael STOROZUM: Geoarchaeology in China: A Review and Future Prospects [264]

Tetsuya SHIROISHI: Production structure and Environment of yayoi period in Japan [265]

 

XLII General Session: Archaeology of Sichuan, China

Chair: WAN Jiao

WAN Jiao: The Cultural Evolution of Chengdu Plain – The distribution of prehistoric sites in Chengdu Plain [266]

LEI Yu: New discoveries at the Sanxingdui site in recent years [267]

RAN Honglin: A Preliminary Study of the Settlement Remains of the Jinsha site [268]

 ZHANG Wanquan: The New Discoveries from the Ba Culture in Eastern Sichuan [269]

 LIU Zhiyan: The Luojiagou Site of the Han Period in Sichuan [270]

 

XLIII General Session: Archaeology of Japan

Chair: Fumiko IKAWA-SMITH

NAKAMURA Oki: Visualization of local communities and diversity in rituals in the Late and Final Jomon, Japan [271]

Amanda GOMES: Symbolic Structures: Early decorated stone chambers of Northern Kyushu in a Ritual Context [272]

LU Jouchun: A Typology of Chinese Ceramics and Consumption Patterns in 8-11th Century Japan [273]

 

XLIV General Session: Early China

Chair: ZHOU Ligang

LI Yinghua: A macroscopic technological perspective on lithic production of hominids from Early to Late Pleistocene in the Hanshui River Valley, central China [277]

YANG Yuzhang: Human exploitation of plant foods during the Upper Paleolithic in Central China revealed by microplant analysis for the Lingjing site [278]

HU Yaowu, ZHANG Hua: Isotopic evidence of cattle domestication and management during the Neolithic in Shaanxi, China [279]

 ZHANG Juzhong: Formation and development of rice and millet mixed farming in the upper and middle Huaihe River Reach during the Neolithic period [280]

 LUO Wuhong: Phytolith Records of Rice Agriculture during the Middle Neolithic in the Middle Reaches of Huai River Region, China [281]

 

LI Yiping: Social difference between Songze culture and Liangzhu culture as reflected on jade artifacts [282]

SUN Zhuo: The Interregional Cultural Interactions in the Middle Yangtze River and Huai River Basin during the middle of 2nd Millennium BC [283]

ZHANG Junna: Evolution of Yiluo River and its influence on the prehistoric culture and the formation of the Erlitou site in Luoyang basin, Henan province, China [284]

SUN Bo: Integration and Beyond: Roles of Geographical Environment in the Formation of Early State in Longshan Cultural, Shandong [285]

ZHOU Ligang, Sandra GARVIE-LOK: Dietary Transition from the Eastern Zhou to the Han Dynasty on the Central Plains of China: an isotopic study [286]

LIU Yan: Exotic Elements as Seen in Gold Ornaments of the Han Elite Tombs [287]

 

PUBLIC LECTURE: John N. MIKSIC (National University of Singapore) “The Maritime Silk Road, AD 1-1500”

KCB Sponsors: International Center for East Asian Archeology & Cultural History and the Asian Art Society of New England

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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